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N.H. News Roundup

N.H. News Roundup: Loon Mountain’s ice fairy tale, Walking for Aaron Swartz

  • In this Wednesday, Jan. 8, 2014 photo, patrons tour an ice castle at the base of the Loon Mountain ski resort in Lincoln, N.H. The ice castle begins to grow in the fall when the weather gets below freezing and thousands of icicles are made and harvested then placed around sprinkler heads and sprayed with water. The castle will continue to grow as long as the temperatures stay below freezing. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

    In this Wednesday, Jan. 8, 2014 photo, patrons tour an ice castle at the base of the Loon Mountain ski resort in Lincoln, N.H. The ice castle begins to grow in the fall when the weather gets below freezing and thousands of icicles are made and harvested then placed around sprinkler heads and sprayed with water. The castle will continue to grow as long as the temperatures stay below freezing. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

  • In this Wednesday, Jan. 8, 2014 photo, Cory Livingood places icicles on the top of his ice castle at the base of the Loon Mountain ski resort in Lincoln, N.H. The ice castle begins to grow in the fall when the weather gets below freezing and thousands of icicles are made and harvested then placed around sprinkler heads and sprayed with water.  The castle will continue to grow as long as the temperatures stay below freezing. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

    In this Wednesday, Jan. 8, 2014 photo, Cory Livingood places icicles on the top of his ice castle at the base of the Loon Mountain ski resort in Lincoln, N.H. The ice castle begins to grow in the fall when the weather gets below freezing and thousands of icicles are made and harvested then placed around sprinkler heads and sprayed with water. The castle will continue to grow as long as the temperatures stay below freezing. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

  • In this Wednesday, Jan. 8, 2014 photo, patrons tour an ice castle at the base of the Loon Mountain ski resort in Lincoln, N.H. The ice castle begins to grow in the fall when the weather gets below freezing and thousands of icicles are made and harvested then placed around sprinkler heads and sprayed with water.  The castle will continue to grow as long as the temperatures stay below freezing. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

    In this Wednesday, Jan. 8, 2014 photo, patrons tour an ice castle at the base of the Loon Mountain ski resort in Lincoln, N.H. The ice castle begins to grow in the fall when the weather gets below freezing and thousands of icicles are made and harvested then placed around sprinkler heads and sprayed with water. The castle will continue to grow as long as the temperatures stay below freezing. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

  • In this Wednesday Jan. 8, 2014 photo, patrons tour an ice castle at the base of the Loon Mountain ski resort in Lincoln, N.H. The ice castle begins to grow in the fall when the weather gets below freezing and thousands of icicles are made and harvested then placed around sprinkler heads and sprayed with water. The castle will continue to grow as long as the temperatures stay below freezing. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

    In this Wednesday Jan. 8, 2014 photo, patrons tour an ice castle at the base of the Loon Mountain ski resort in Lincoln, N.H. The ice castle begins to grow in the fall when the weather gets below freezing and thousands of icicles are made and harvested then placed around sprinkler heads and sprayed with water. The castle will continue to grow as long as the temperatures stay below freezing. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

  • In this Wednesday, Jan. 8, 2014 photo, patrons tour an ice castle at the base of the Loon Mountain ski resort in Lincoln, N.H. The ice castle begins to grow in the fall when the weather gets below freezing and thousands of icicles are made and harvested then placed around sprinkler heads and sprayed with water. The castle will continue to grow as long as the temperatures stay below freezing. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)
  • In this Wednesday, Jan. 8, 2014 photo, Cory Livingood places icicles on the top of his ice castle at the base of the Loon Mountain ski resort in Lincoln, N.H. The ice castle begins to grow in the fall when the weather gets below freezing and thousands of icicles are made and harvested then placed around sprinkler heads and sprayed with water.  The castle will continue to grow as long as the temperatures stay below freezing. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)
  • In this Wednesday, Jan. 8, 2014 photo, patrons tour an ice castle at the base of the Loon Mountain ski resort in Lincoln, N.H. The ice castle begins to grow in the fall when the weather gets below freezing and thousands of icicles are made and harvested then placed around sprinkler heads and sprayed with water.  The castle will continue to grow as long as the temperatures stay below freezing. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)
  • In this Wednesday Jan. 8, 2014 photo, patrons tour an ice castle at the base of the Loon Mountain ski resort in Lincoln, N.H. The ice castle begins to grow in the fall when the weather gets below freezing and thousands of icicles are made and harvested then placed around sprinkler heads and sprayed with water. The castle will continue to grow as long as the temperatures stay below freezing. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

Seemingly by all accounts, the ice castle at Loon Mountain is straight out of a Disney movie. Or a fairy tale. Or a Disney movie about a fairy tale.

The castle debuted a the end of last year, and has been a destination for tourists since.

Instead of building the castle, those involved describe the process more like farming. They grow the initial icicles, then they harvest them. After that, they increase the size of some of them using processes that can include using sprinkler heads. And then of course comes the building.

The Granite State is the third state to boast one of these ice castles from the company aptly named Ice Castles. They’ve also been built in Colorado and Utah.

The company’s founder Brent Christensen began his process building slides and forts for his daughters in his Utah backyard using wood and other materials. But the process has evolved over time.

But don’t expect Loon’s castle to stay the same for the entire season. The New Hampshire castle’s lead man, Cory Livingood, said the central towers will continue to grow as long as the castle is around.

Loon Mountain is charging $8-10 for general admission to the castle depending on the day, and $5-7 for children.

Check out Ice Castle’s website for more information on the Loon castle as well as some of their other creations.

Be sure to catch this cool music video by Lindsey Stirling, too. It was shot inside one of their castles. (Big thanks to NHPR – linked aboved – for getting the video in front of my eyes and ears. The music is pretty great, too. I've already listened to the song twice this morning.)

So have you seen the ice castle? Let us know what it was like in the comments!

In other news

∎ Harvard professor and internet legend Lawrence Lessig is walking across New Hampshire in memory of computer coder and Internet freedom activist Aaron Swartz, who committed suicide a year ago while being prosecuted on federal hacking charges. Here is a statement by Lessig on the Huffington Post website about why he’s walking and what he hopes to achieve.

∎ The N.H. Legislature will try again Wednesday to vote whether or not to decriminal less than 1 oz. of recreational marijuana use for people who are 21 and older.

 A Mass. teenager was killed in Wakefield after a car driven by her mother crossed the center line and collided with another vehicle.

∎ The Senate Majority PAC has set its sights on Scott Brown with an ad that’s airing in the Granite State.

∎ Even though numbers are declining, officials say the New Hampshire’s moose population is just fine.

∎ Check out these cool 1942 photos from LIFE magazine of the first class of women to undergo the same military training as men. It just happens to be at UNH – in the snow . . . of course.

∎ Rush Limbaugh took a caller from Rochester recently who wasn’t too pleased with the congressional response to her chemtrail complaint.

 Londonderry wrestlers were the big winners at the Merrimack Hall of Fame Tournament over the weekend.

∎ The success of the Patriots has been a boon for N.H. bars and restaurants.

(Have ideas for the roundup? Reach web editor Kevin Deane at 369-3302 or email him at kdeane@cmonitor.com. Follow him on Twitter, @CM_KDeane.)

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