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Declaration of Independence signer’s Kingston home for sale

  • An historic marker is seen in front of the home once owned by Josiah Bartlett, Wednesday, July 16, 2014 in Kingston, N.H.  The home of New Hampshire Declaration of Independence signer, Bartlett, is up for sale after being in the family for seven generations. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

    An historic marker is seen in front of the home once owned by Josiah Bartlett, Wednesday, July 16, 2014 in Kingston, N.H. The home of New Hampshire Declaration of Independence signer, Bartlett, is up for sale after being in the family for seven generations. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

  • Ruth Albert, the great-great-great-great-granddaughter of Josiah Bartlett, the  former New Hampshire governor, and signer of  the Declaration of Independence poses Wednesday July 16, 2014 by the desk and under the portrait of Bartlett in Kingston, N.H. After living in the home for many years  Bartlett's home is up for sale after being in the family for seven generations. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

    Ruth Albert, the great-great-great-great-granddaughter of Josiah Bartlett, the former New Hampshire governor, and signer of the Declaration of Independence poses Wednesday July 16, 2014 by the desk and under the portrait of Bartlett in Kingston, N.H. After living in the home for many years Bartlett's home is up for sale after being in the family for seven generations. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

  • A linden tree planted as a sapling by Josiah Bartlett after signing the Declaration of Independence is seen on the front lawn of his home Wednesday July 16, 2014 in Kingston, N.H. The home, which has been in the family for seven generations, is now up for sale. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

    A linden tree planted as a sapling by Josiah Bartlett after signing the Declaration of Independence is seen on the front lawn of his home Wednesday July 16, 2014 in Kingston, N.H. The home, which has been in the family for seven generations, is now up for sale. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

  • A commode and hand pumped bath tub are seen on the second floor of the Josiah Bartlett home, Wednesday, July 16, 2014, in Kingston, N.H. The four-bedroom farmhouse that was built in 1774 for former New Hampshire governor and signer of the Declaration of Independence is up for sale after being in the family for seven generations. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

    A commode and hand pumped bath tub are seen on the second floor of the Josiah Bartlett home, Wednesday, July 16, 2014, in Kingston, N.H. The four-bedroom farmhouse that was built in 1774 for former New Hampshire governor and signer of the Declaration of Independence is up for sale after being in the family for seven generations. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

  • The parlor of the four-bedroom farmhouse built in 1774 for former New Hampshire governor and signer of the Declaration of Independence Josiah Bartlett is seen Wednesday July 16, 2014 in Kingston, N.H. The home is up for sale after being in the family for seven generations. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

    The parlor of the four-bedroom farmhouse built in 1774 for former New Hampshire governor and signer of the Declaration of Independence Josiah Bartlett is seen Wednesday July 16, 2014 in Kingston, N.H. The home is up for sale after being in the family for seven generations. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

  • One of four bedrooms, complete with a wood stove is seen in the farmhouse built in 1774 for former New Hampshire governor and signer of the Declaration of Independence Josiah Bartlett Wednesday July 16, 2014, in Kingston, N.H. The home is up for sale after being in the family for seven generations. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

    One of four bedrooms, complete with a wood stove is seen in the farmhouse built in 1774 for former New Hampshire governor and signer of the Declaration of Independence Josiah Bartlett Wednesday July 16, 2014, in Kingston, N.H. The home is up for sale after being in the family for seven generations. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

  • The fireplace in the old kitchen of a four-bedroom farmhouse built in 1774 for former New Hampshire governor and signer of the Declaration of Independence Josiah Bartlett is seen Wednesday July 16, 2014 in Kingston, N.H. The home is up for sale after being in the family for seven generations. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

    The fireplace in the old kitchen of a four-bedroom farmhouse built in 1774 for former New Hampshire governor and signer of the Declaration of Independence Josiah Bartlett is seen Wednesday July 16, 2014 in Kingston, N.H. The home is up for sale after being in the family for seven generations. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

  • An historic marker is seen in front of the home once owned by Josiah Bartlett, Wednesday, July 16, 2014 in Kingston, N.H.  The home of New Hampshire Declaration of Independence signer, Bartlett, is up for sale after being in the family for seven generations. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

    An historic marker is seen in front of the home once owned by Josiah Bartlett, Wednesday, July 16, 2014 in Kingston, N.H. The home of New Hampshire Declaration of Independence signer, Bartlett, is up for sale after being in the family for seven generations. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

  • An historic marker is seen in front of the home once owned by Josiah Bartlett, Wednesday, July 16, 2014 in Kingston, N.H.  The home of New Hampshire Declaration of Independence signer, Bartlett, is up for sale after being in the family for seven generations. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)
  • Ruth Albert, the great-great-great-great-granddaughter of Josiah Bartlett, the  former New Hampshire governor, and signer of  the Declaration of Independence poses Wednesday July 16, 2014 by the desk and under the portrait of Bartlett in Kingston, N.H. After living in the home for many years  Bartlett's home is up for sale after being in the family for seven generations. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)
  • A linden tree planted as a sapling by Josiah Bartlett after signing the Declaration of Independence is seen on the front lawn of his home Wednesday July 16, 2014 in Kingston, N.H. The home, which has been in the family for seven generations, is now up for sale. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)
  • A commode and hand pumped bath tub are seen on the second floor of the Josiah Bartlett home, Wednesday, July 16, 2014, in Kingston, N.H. The four-bedroom farmhouse that was built in 1774 for former New Hampshire governor and signer of the Declaration of Independence is up for sale after being in the family for seven generations. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)
  • The parlor of the four-bedroom farmhouse built in 1774 for former New Hampshire governor and signer of the Declaration of Independence Josiah Bartlett is seen Wednesday July 16, 2014 in Kingston, N.H. The home is up for sale after being in the family for seven generations. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)
  • One of four bedrooms, complete with a wood stove is seen in the farmhouse built in 1774 for former New Hampshire governor and signer of the Declaration of Independence Josiah Bartlett Wednesday July 16, 2014, in Kingston, N.H. The home is up for sale after being in the family for seven generations. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)
  • The fireplace in the old kitchen of a four-bedroom farmhouse built in 1774 for former New Hampshire governor and signer of the Declaration of Independence Josiah Bartlett is seen Wednesday July 16, 2014 in Kingston, N.H. The home is up for sale after being in the family for seven generations. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)
  • An historic marker is seen in front of the home once owned by Josiah Bartlett, Wednesday, July 16, 2014 in Kingston, N.H.  The home of New Hampshire Declaration of Independence signer, Bartlett, is up for sale after being in the family for seven generations. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

The home of New Hampshire Declaration of Independence signer Josiah Bartlett is up for sale after being in the family for seven generations.

The 18-acre property in Kingston offers a white 4,600-square-foot, four-bedroom farmhouse that was built in 1774 and has been updated through the years, plus open pasture and woods. The front yard has a linden tree Bartlett brought back from Philadelphia as a sapling after signing the Declaration of Independence.

“It’s thriving on its own very nicely,” said Ruth Albert, the current homeowner and Bartlett’s great-great-great-great-granddaughter.

The home’s asking price is $849,900.

It’s the first time the home, added to the National Registry of Historic Places in 1972, is for sale. No other family members are available to purchase the property.

“It’s very bittersweet,” said Albert, 63. “I’m hoping that someone who loves history will like the house.” She had hoped that a historic preservation society might take it over and turn it into a museum, but after meeting with representatives from various historical groups in the state, she realized the funding for such a project is scarce.

Ben Wilson, director of New Hampshire’s Bureau of Historic Sites, said the state can’t afford to buy and operate the property in perpetuity. If a private entity were to buy the building and give it to the state as a gift along with a $1 million endowment, Wilson said that likely would provide enough annual revenue to maintain the home as a historic site.

“The house would fit beautifully in our quiver of historic sites,” he said.

Little has changed in the house since the 1850s, when renovations were done to the kitchen. More recently, the couple added an upstairs bathroom.

Albert, who recently retired from her job with the U.S. Postal Service in Kingston, grew up in the house and has had fun through the years picturing her ancestors there. She remembers her grandmother telling her she was lucky to have electricity as she did her homework; in her grandmother’s day, it was candlelight and lanterns.

Albert and her husband, Dale, are planning to move to Florida, his home state, and live in a much smaller house.

Bartlett, a doctor and later governor of New Hampshire, moved from Amesbury, Mass., to Kingston in 1750 to set up practice. He married his cousin Mary Bartlett and they had 12 children. One of his sons, Levi Bartlett, lived in the house, and it has stayed in the family ever since. Josiah Bartlett’s medical instruments are displayed in the parlor.

OK . . the article writer said: "No other family members are available to purchase the property." The Associated Press must NOT have looked very far, or done much research on the subject, as our family is VERY large -and spread out, all over the country. My mother, June Alberta Bartlett, the next-to-last of 5 children, born to Dr. Albert Bartlett, Dorchester, MA, was the Great-Grand daughter (about 6 times removed), of Josiah. Her older brother, Josiah, was a namesake of our patriotic ancestor. We were raised, steeped in the 'history' and heroism of our forebear, who, along with the other “Signers”, risked their "Lives, . . Fortunes, and . . sacred Honor". Perhaps, the Associated Press could dig a little deeper, as I would be interested in approaching the possibility of keeping this wonderful piece of history “in the family”!

Only: $500.00 for one of his Promissory Notes over at: http://www.abebooks.com/Promissory-Note-Real-Declaration-Signer-Jed/10138112123/bd that also reads: "As senior delegate to the northernmost colony, he was the second man to sign the Declaration of Independence, immediately following John Hancock" . I found this through the BING search engine in trying to find any info on former Lincoln, N.H. Town Clerk of the 1970s of Nate Bartlett who was a relative.

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