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Downtown

Downtown: Inside the new Endicott Hotel apartments

  • The Endicott Hotel, which will house one, two and three-bedroom apartments soon, was open for viewing during Intown Concord's tour of downtown buildings and businesses that took place Wednesday, May 22, 2013.<br/><br/>JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff

    The Endicott Hotel, which will house one, two and three-bedroom apartments soon, was open for viewing during Intown Concord's tour of downtown buildings and businesses that took place Wednesday, May 22, 2013.

    JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff

  • Still under construction for one, two and three-bedroom apartments, the Endicott Hotel was open to viewing during Intown Concord's tour of downtown buildings and businesses that took place Wednesday, May 22, 2013.<br/><br/>JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff

    Still under construction for one, two and three-bedroom apartments, the Endicott Hotel was open to viewing during Intown Concord's tour of downtown buildings and businesses that took place Wednesday, May 22, 2013.

    JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff

  • The Endicott Hotel, which will house one, two and three-bedroom apartments soon, was open for viewing during Intown Concord's tour of downtown buildings and businesses that took place Wednesday, May 22, 2013.<br/><br/>JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff
  • Still under construction for one, two and three-bedroom apartments, the Endicott Hotel was open to viewing during Intown Concord's tour of downtown buildings and businesses that took place Wednesday, May 22, 2013.<br/><br/>JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff

The wooden staircase inside the Endicott Hotel is still covered in dust from construction and creaks with the weight of footsteps. Soon, it will welcome residents into their new downtown apartments.

The historic building on South Main Street will reopen this summer as 24 market-rate apartments.

“So when this is finished, when you come up the corridors and up those stairs, it will all be rehabbed and refurbished as an old stairway,” said Mike Reed, director of real estate for CATCH Neighborhood Housing.

“And then when you come into your unit, it will have a mix of historical character and some modern features.”

More than 100 people got a first look at the construction site last week as part of Intown Concord’s annual Upstairs, Downtown tour. (The Monitor was one of the tour’s corporate sponsors.)

The apartment units were still drywall last week; installation of dark laminate hardwood floors has begun in some areas.

CATCH is now accepting applications from potential tenants, and Reed said he hopes residents can move in Aug. 1.

Since construction began, CATCH has received more than 100 inquiries from potential tenants. But Reed encouraged everyone to apply for a spot, even if they

haven’t previously contacted CATCH.

Though no two apartments are the same, Reed said, they’ll have similar interior designs.

Apartments are one, two or three bedrooms, ranging in rent from $975 to $1,350.

The building will also have one two-story loft; Reed said damage from a February 2012 fire in the building allowed CATCH to use the space creatively.

“We had a fire that took two units together and we were looking at it and said, ‘Let’s take 25 units down to 24 and make a loft unit out of it,’ ” he said.

Painting was just beginning last week, but CATCH Project Manager Caite Foley said a team of four interior designers are working on the space.

Apartments will feature an open space concept, stainless steel appliances, cambria countertops and “beautiful lighting fixtures,” Foley said.

CATCH found designers Renee Rucci, Aimee LeDuc, Julie Wood and Vicky Frazier through the New Hampshire Institute of Art. All four women graduated from the institute and now have their own design companies, but are collaborating on the Endicott Hotel project.

“We picked one (theme), which was marrying the historic and modern,” Foley said. “So they’ve done all of our finishes, interior of our apartments, all of our common space – down to our mailbox choice.”

The apartment building will include shared laundry facilities, a workout room and a common area for residents.

Foley said the designers will stage two apartments to show to potential tenants this summer.

The renovated building will also have retail and office space. Reed said he is still looking for tenants to occupy the former Green Martini space on the Pleasant Street Extension and 1,500 square feet of office space on the second floor.

Another residence on last week’s Upstairs, Downtown tour was the apartment above Rowland Studio on North Main Street. Doug and Terri Walton told tour groups that they did much of their own design and construction work to transform the two floors above their store into a luxury apartment.

And more market-rate housing could be on its way to South Main Street, when the city chooses a developer for the state Employment Security site. Developer Steve Duprey said last week that he’s one of the bidders for that property, and he’d like to build between 30 and 50 living units.

New to Capital Commons

Intown Concord’s tour last week concluded with a reception at the Capital Commons building, where developer Michael Simchik announced a new tenant.

Penn Mutual, a life insurance and wealth management company, will occupy offices on the sixth floor of the Capital Commons building.

Mark McPherson, a managing partner of Penn Mutual who will work from Concord, said the move will be an expansion for his company and its first location in New Hampshire.

McPherson said 15 advisers will work from the Concord office, which will be known as Concord Wealth Management instead of Penn Mutual.

“So we’re proud to say it, we’re going to be in the community,” he told the small crowd gathered at the reception. “We hope to see you a lot as we’re walking the streets.”

Steam and snowmelt

City councilors will make several decisions about Main Street this week, including whether to install a snowmelt system powered by steam heat. City officials have suggested the city shouldn’t pay for a snowmelt system while Concord Steam’s future remains unclear.

But, developer Steve Duprey assured the council Thursday night, they’ll soon have an answer. He knows that because his company has gotten involved in helping the utility. Concord Steam has long planned a new facility in the South End but has yet to secure financing.

“Recently we’ve become much more involved in trying to push that project along,” Duprey told the city council.

To build a new plant in the South End, Duprey added, Concord Steam must use a specific tax credit that requires construction to begin before the end of the year.

“I think everybody understands there’s going to be a short window,” he said. “By the time you get your bids in (on a snowmelt system) you will have . . . a very good idea if the heated sidewalks are viable.”

Down to the details

The city council is expected to analyze every design detail – and every dollar – during their work session on the Main Street project this week.

They’ll even have to analyze the future of newspapers.

On Thursday night, the design team presented a uniform newspaper dispenser that could hold several papers and magazines. They also presented a less expensive corral-type structure that would simply group freestanding newspaper boxes.

City Manager Tom Aspell said the council can make a decision.

“Are there going to be newspapers five years from now?” he said. “It’s that close.”

The council will meet for a work session tomorrow at 7 p.m. and again on Wednesday and Thursday nights, as needed.

Market season

It’s that time of year again: Concord’s streets will be filled with local goods Saturday morning.

The Concord Farmers Market will open for the season Saturday. It begins at 8:30 a.m. on Capitol Street.

The Concord Arts Market will also begin its season Saturday in Bicentennial Square.

Memorial Day

Concord will hold its Memorial Day parade this morning.

The parade starts at 9 a.m. at Burlington Coat Factory on Storrs Street. It will include ceremonies at Old North Cemetery and in front of the war memorial on the State House Plaza.

Downtown parking is free today, and city offices are closed. Trash pickup will run one day behind schedule this week.

(Laura McCrystal can be reached at 369-3312 or
lmccrystal@cmonitor.com or on Twitter @lmccrystal.)

any reader care to guess where CATCH Neighborhood housing gets its funds from?

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