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Opinion

The Boston Tea Party of 1773, as depicted in an old Engraving.Bostonians dressed as Indians dumped 342 chests of tea overboard from three British ships in protest against "taxation without representation."      The famous tea party took place at Griffin's Wharf, where the ships were tied up. The site remained a landmark even after the waterfront was filled in, leaving the spot several hundred yards inland.     Recently there were rumors that the site was "lost".   It was re-discovered in the center of rubble of buildings being torn down to make way for an elevated highway.   A temporary sign marks the spot.     (AP Photo)

My Turn: Thanksgiving and revolution

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

It’s again time to celebrate the older of America’s two extraordinary “T-parties,” Thanksgiving. The two parties are strikingly different. For one thing, they arose at two very different times. Pilgrims in the early 1600s were vulnerable newcomers, allowed to share land that red men had occupied for millennia, and to share it rent-free because of the strange Native American belief …

My Turn: On immigration, U.S. can learn from the Romans

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

In 2007, Cullen Murphy’s intriguing book Are We Rome? was published. Although a slender volume, it shed new light on a long-discussed issue. To what extent is the United States the new Rome? Our founders certainly looked to the Roman republic for many of the aspects of the new government they were creating. We have, for example, a Senate and also selected the …

Editorial: Be thankful, New England sports fans

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Life tends to hit its stride on Thanksgiving. Dinnertime isn’t a hurdle to be cleared, hugs are doled out a little less awkwardly, and excess calories and laziness aren’t only accepted, they’re expected. For a day, the tiresome mental newsreel that plays on an endless loop in the stressed-out mind is silenced by the present moment. And everybody gives thanks because there is …

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Well, I just reread my comment and realized it's pretty much what John_V_Kjellman wrote, albeit in slightly different words. ...(full comment)

Editorial: Kansas has a few lessons for New Hampshire

Another danger of straight ticket voting is that you might unknowingly vote for a candidate whose views are diametrically opposed to your...(full comment)

Editorial: Kansas has a few lessons for New Hampshire

Letter: Time’s up

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Since it is almost three weeks since the election, all of the political signage should have been removed. I am referring specifically to the Garcia, Guay and Burns signs that are littering Exit 1 in Bow and elsewhere around town. These signs are on the state and town …

Letter: The wrong headline

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

It’s been a while, but I see that the writer of the sub headline for an article who doesn’t read the article is back working at the Monitor. The latest example of his or her talent is on page A6 of the Monday, Nov. 24, edition describing an …

Letter: Local food, locals sources

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

This is in response to the brewing opinions in regard to the Fournier Foods processing plant. It seems to me after observing the process for some time that some of us take a prejudicial view and overlook the contribution that growth makes to our communities. I believe that …

Letter: A new ‘Pickles’ fan

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

I usually at least skim over letters to the editor, and the latest brouhaha about the cartoon Pickles caught my attention. I don’t think I’d ever really tuned in to it, but I checked it out to see what the controversy was about. I love it now and …

Letter: Twisting the truth

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

I’m upset with all this Ferguson reporting. Most people never really give the facts in the Michael Brown case. Gee, even the Brown family’s lawyer, Benjamin Crump, who appeared on ABC with George Stephanopoulos recently, can’t tell the truth. His last words were “little black boy dead on …

Letter: Blowing smoke

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

So, the Obamacare naysayers have been proclaiming for weeks that health care costs are going to skyrocket now that the ACA is in place. Well, maybe not so much here in New Hampshire. The real story is that thanks to competition (New Hampshire will have five competing providers …

Letter: Thankful in Henniker

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Regarding Ray Duckler’s excellent article on Carol Conforti-Adams (Sunday Monitor front page, Nov. 16), Henniker is fortunate to have such a strong, committed and experienced person as Carol as the new caseworker providing much needed additional human services to the community. Henniker selectmen should be commended for their …

Letter: The bigger problem

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

My sympathy for Raymond Valas (Monitor front page, Nov. 22) is limited; it’s unfathomable in today’s world that a man like Valas would solicit sex from an underage teenager. He should be punished, but putting him in prison for the rest of his life will benefit nobody and …

My Turn: Compromise, not ideology, key to legislative success

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Politics is defined by conflict, government by compromise. This balance seems to be perpetually lost on Washington, where politicians are swept away in perceived mandates and partisan warfare. This is not what the people want. Quite frankly, it’s what they most dislike about politics, and now it is …

Editorial: An American story for a popular doll

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

In 1899, economist Thorstein Veblen introduced the world to the term “conspicuous consumption” in his book The Theory of the Leisure Class. Veblen argued that there was a middle-class tendency to buy items not to meet needs but to serve solely as a display of wealth. What catchy …