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Brown faces history, residency questions in N.H. bid

  • This photo taken March 22, 2014 shows former Massachusetts Sen. Scott Brown, left, talking with Peter Thompson at his maple sugar house in Orford, N.H. Brown is fighting to re-write political history as he tours New Hampshire. But there are early signs that the state's notoriously feisty voters may be reluctant to embrace the recent Republican transplant. Brown joined New Hampshire’s U.S. Senate race roughly a week ago. He moved to the state 13 weeks ago. Brown is trying to become the third person to serve more than one state in the Senate. The last one was elected more than two centuries ago. His residency figures to play prominently in his quest to defeat Democratic Sen. Jeanne Shaheen this fall.  (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

    This photo taken March 22, 2014 shows former Massachusetts Sen. Scott Brown, left, talking with Peter Thompson at his maple sugar house in Orford, N.H. Brown is fighting to re-write political history as he tours New Hampshire. But there are early signs that the state's notoriously feisty voters may be reluctant to embrace the recent Republican transplant. Brown joined New Hampshire’s U.S. Senate race roughly a week ago. He moved to the state 13 weeks ago. Brown is trying to become the third person to serve more than one state in the Senate. The last one was elected more than two centuries ago. His residency figures to play prominently in his quest to defeat Democratic Sen. Jeanne Shaheen this fall. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

  • This photo taken March 22, 2014 shows former Massachusetts Sen. Scott Brown greeting voters at the Mount Cube maple sugar house in Orford, N.H. Brown is fighting to re-write political history as he tours New Hampshire. But there are early signs that the state's notoriously feisty voters may be reluctant to embrace the recent Republican transplant. Brown joined New Hampshire’s U.S. Senate race roughly a week ago. He moved to the state 13 weeks ago. Brown is trying to become the third person to serve more than one state in the Senate. The last one was elected more than two centuries ago. His residency figures to play prominently in his quest to defeat Democratic Sen. Jeanne Shaheen this fall.  (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

    This photo taken March 22, 2014 shows former Massachusetts Sen. Scott Brown greeting voters at the Mount Cube maple sugar house in Orford, N.H. Brown is fighting to re-write political history as he tours New Hampshire. But there are early signs that the state's notoriously feisty voters may be reluctant to embrace the recent Republican transplant. Brown joined New Hampshire’s U.S. Senate race roughly a week ago. He moved to the state 13 weeks ago. Brown is trying to become the third person to serve more than one state in the Senate. The last one was elected more than two centuries ago. His residency figures to play prominently in his quest to defeat Democratic Sen. Jeanne Shaheen this fall. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

  • This photo taken March 22, 2014 shows former Massachusetts Sen. Scott Brown posing for a photo with a group of women at the Tilton Diner in Tilton, N.H. Brown is fighting to re-write political history as he tours New Hampshire. But there are early signs that the state's notoriously feisty voters may be reluctant to embrace the recent Republican transplant. Brown joined New Hampshire’s U.S. Senate race roughly a week ago. He moved to the state 13 weeks ago. Brown is trying to become the third person to serve more than one state in the Senate. The last one was elected more than two centuries ago. His residency figures to play prominently in his quest to defeat Democratic Sen. Jeanne Shaheen this fall.  (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

    This photo taken March 22, 2014 shows former Massachusetts Sen. Scott Brown posing for a photo with a group of women at the Tilton Diner in Tilton, N.H. Brown is fighting to re-write political history as he tours New Hampshire. But there are early signs that the state's notoriously feisty voters may be reluctant to embrace the recent Republican transplant. Brown joined New Hampshire’s U.S. Senate race roughly a week ago. He moved to the state 13 weeks ago. Brown is trying to become the third person to serve more than one state in the Senate. The last one was elected more than two centuries ago. His residency figures to play prominently in his quest to defeat Democratic Sen. Jeanne Shaheen this fall. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

  • This photo taken March 22, 2014, shows former Massachusetts Sen. Scott Brown in his pick-up truck in Tilton, N.H. as he makes his way through the state. Brown is fighting to re-write political history as he tours New Hampshire. But there are early signs that the state's notoriously feisty voters may be reluctant to embrace the recent Republican transplant. Brown joined New Hampshire’s U.S. Senate race roughly a week ago. He moved to the state 13 weeks ago. Brown is trying to become the third person to serve more than one state in the Senate. The last one was elected more than two centuries ago. His residency figures to play prominently in his quest to defeat Democratic Sen. Jeanne Shaheen this fall.  (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

    This photo taken March 22, 2014, shows former Massachusetts Sen. Scott Brown in his pick-up truck in Tilton, N.H. as he makes his way through the state. Brown is fighting to re-write political history as he tours New Hampshire. But there are early signs that the state's notoriously feisty voters may be reluctant to embrace the recent Republican transplant. Brown joined New Hampshire’s U.S. Senate race roughly a week ago. He moved to the state 13 weeks ago. Brown is trying to become the third person to serve more than one state in the Senate. The last one was elected more than two centuries ago. His residency figures to play prominently in his quest to defeat Democratic Sen. Jeanne Shaheen this fall. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

  • This photo taken March 22, 2014, shows former Massachusetts Sen. Scott Brown meeting with patrons at the Tilton Diner in Tilton, N.H. Brown is fighting to re-write political history as he tours New Hampshire. But there are early signs that the state's notoriously feisty voters may be reluctant to embrace the recent Republican transplant. Brown joined New Hampshire’s U.S. Senate race roughly a week ago. He moved to the state 13 weeks ago. Brown is trying to become the third person to serve more than one state in the Senate. The last one was elected more than two centuries ago. His residency figures to play prominently in his quest to defeat Democratic Sen. Jeanne Shaheen this fall.  (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

    This photo taken March 22, 2014, shows former Massachusetts Sen. Scott Brown meeting with patrons at the Tilton Diner in Tilton, N.H. Brown is fighting to re-write political history as he tours New Hampshire. But there are early signs that the state's notoriously feisty voters may be reluctant to embrace the recent Republican transplant. Brown joined New Hampshire’s U.S. Senate race roughly a week ago. He moved to the state 13 weeks ago. Brown is trying to become the third person to serve more than one state in the Senate. The last one was elected more than two centuries ago. His residency figures to play prominently in his quest to defeat Democratic Sen. Jeanne Shaheen this fall. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

  • This photo taken March 22, 2014, shows former Massachusetts Sen. Scott Brown driveing his pick-up truck along the back roads in Orford, N.H.  Brown is fighting to re-write political history as he tours New Hampshire. But there are early signs that the state's notoriously feisty voters may be reluctant to embrace the recent Republican transplant. Brown joined New Hampshire’s U.S. Senate race roughly a week ago. He moved to the state 13 weeks ago. Brown is trying to become the third person to serve more than one state in the Senate. The last one was elected more than two centuries ago. His residency figures to play prominently in his quest to defeat Democratic Sen. Jeanne Shaheen this fall.  (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

    This photo taken March 22, 2014, shows former Massachusetts Sen. Scott Brown driveing his pick-up truck along the back roads in Orford, N.H. Brown is fighting to re-write political history as he tours New Hampshire. But there are early signs that the state's notoriously feisty voters may be reluctant to embrace the recent Republican transplant. Brown joined New Hampshire’s U.S. Senate race roughly a week ago. He moved to the state 13 weeks ago. Brown is trying to become the third person to serve more than one state in the Senate. The last one was elected more than two centuries ago. His residency figures to play prominently in his quest to defeat Democratic Sen. Jeanne Shaheen this fall. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

  • This photo taken March 22, 2014, shows former Massachusetts Sen. Scott Brown in his pick-up truck in Tilton, N.H. as he makes his way through the state. Brown is fighting to re-write political history as he tours New Hampshire. But there are early signs that the state's notoriously feisty voters may be reluctant to embrace the recent Republican transplant. Brown joined New Hampshire’s U.S. Senate race roughly a week ago. He moved to the state 13 weeks ago. Brown is trying to become the third person to serve more than one state in the Senate. The last one was elected more than two centuries ago. His residency figures to play prominently in his quest to defeat Democratic Sen. Jeanne Shaheen this fall.  (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

    This photo taken March 22, 2014, shows former Massachusetts Sen. Scott Brown in his pick-up truck in Tilton, N.H. as he makes his way through the state. Brown is fighting to re-write political history as he tours New Hampshire. But there are early signs that the state's notoriously feisty voters may be reluctant to embrace the recent Republican transplant. Brown joined New Hampshire’s U.S. Senate race roughly a week ago. He moved to the state 13 weeks ago. Brown is trying to become the third person to serve more than one state in the Senate. The last one was elected more than two centuries ago. His residency figures to play prominently in his quest to defeat Democratic Sen. Jeanne Shaheen this fall. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

  • This photo taken March 22, 2014 shows former Massachusetts Sen. Scott Brown, left, talking with Peter Thompson at his maple sugar house in Orford, N.H. Brown is fighting to re-write political history as he tours New Hampshire. But there are early signs that the state's notoriously feisty voters may be reluctant to embrace the recent Republican transplant. Brown joined New Hampshire’s U.S. Senate race roughly a week ago. He moved to the state 13 weeks ago. Brown is trying to become the third person to serve more than one state in the Senate. The last one was elected more than two centuries ago. His residency figures to play prominently in his quest to defeat Democratic Sen. Jeanne Shaheen this fall.  (AP Photo/Jim Cole)
  • This photo taken March 22, 2014 shows former Massachusetts Sen. Scott Brown greeting voters at the Mount Cube maple sugar house in Orford, N.H. Brown is fighting to re-write political history as he tours New Hampshire. But there are early signs that the state's notoriously feisty voters may be reluctant to embrace the recent Republican transplant. Brown joined New Hampshire’s U.S. Senate race roughly a week ago. He moved to the state 13 weeks ago. Brown is trying to become the third person to serve more than one state in the Senate. The last one was elected more than two centuries ago. His residency figures to play prominently in his quest to defeat Democratic Sen. Jeanne Shaheen this fall.  (AP Photo/Jim Cole)
  • This photo taken March 22, 2014 shows former Massachusetts Sen. Scott Brown posing for a photo with a group of women at the Tilton Diner in Tilton, N.H. Brown is fighting to re-write political history as he tours New Hampshire. But there are early signs that the state's notoriously feisty voters may be reluctant to embrace the recent Republican transplant. Brown joined New Hampshire’s U.S. Senate race roughly a week ago. He moved to the state 13 weeks ago. Brown is trying to become the third person to serve more than one state in the Senate. The last one was elected more than two centuries ago. His residency figures to play prominently in his quest to defeat Democratic Sen. Jeanne Shaheen this fall.  (AP Photo/Jim Cole)
  • This photo taken March 22, 2014, shows former Massachusetts Sen. Scott Brown in his pick-up truck in Tilton, N.H. as he makes his way through the state. Brown is fighting to re-write political history as he tours New Hampshire. But there are early signs that the state's notoriously feisty voters may be reluctant to embrace the recent Republican transplant. Brown joined New Hampshire’s U.S. Senate race roughly a week ago. He moved to the state 13 weeks ago. Brown is trying to become the third person to serve more than one state in the Senate. The last one was elected more than two centuries ago. His residency figures to play prominently in his quest to defeat Democratic Sen. Jeanne Shaheen this fall.  (AP Photo/Jim Cole)
  • This photo taken March 22, 2014, shows former Massachusetts Sen. Scott Brown meeting with patrons at the Tilton Diner in Tilton, N.H. Brown is fighting to re-write political history as he tours New Hampshire. But there are early signs that the state's notoriously feisty voters may be reluctant to embrace the recent Republican transplant. Brown joined New Hampshire’s U.S. Senate race roughly a week ago. He moved to the state 13 weeks ago. Brown is trying to become the third person to serve more than one state in the Senate. The last one was elected more than two centuries ago. His residency figures to play prominently in his quest to defeat Democratic Sen. Jeanne Shaheen this fall.  (AP Photo/Jim Cole)
  • This photo taken March 22, 2014, shows former Massachusetts Sen. Scott Brown driveing his pick-up truck along the back roads in Orford, N.H.  Brown is fighting to re-write political history as he tours New Hampshire. But there are early signs that the state's notoriously feisty voters may be reluctant to embrace the recent Republican transplant. Brown joined New Hampshire’s U.S. Senate race roughly a week ago. He moved to the state 13 weeks ago. Brown is trying to become the third person to serve more than one state in the Senate. The last one was elected more than two centuries ago. His residency figures to play prominently in his quest to defeat Democratic Sen. Jeanne Shaheen this fall.  (AP Photo/Jim Cole)
  • This photo taken March 22, 2014, shows former Massachusetts Sen. Scott Brown in his pick-up truck in Tilton, N.H. as he makes his way through the state. Brown is fighting to re-write political history as he tours New Hampshire. But there are early signs that the state's notoriously feisty voters may be reluctant to embrace the recent Republican transplant. Brown joined New Hampshire’s U.S. Senate race roughly a week ago. He moved to the state 13 weeks ago. Brown is trying to become the third person to serve more than one state in the Senate. The last one was elected more than two centuries ago. His residency figures to play prominently in his quest to defeat Democratic Sen. Jeanne Shaheen this fall.  (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

Former Massachusetts U.S. senator Scott Brown is suiting up his campaign armor again – faded blue jeans, cowboy boots and a storied pickup truck – this time in New Hampshire as he tries to make modern history and help the GOP reclaim the Senate.

But a week after Brown effectively joined New Hampshire’s Senate race, it’s unclear whether the every-man appeal that fueled his rise in Massachusetts is enough to revive his political career north of the state line. There are early signs that the state’s famously feisty voters may be reluctant to embrace the recent Republican transplant.

“New Hampshire people want New Hampshire people,” said Kim Pratt, a 52-year-old self-described independent voter, sitting at the Red Arrow Diner’s breakfast counter as Brown shook hands nearby during a weekend visit. “He’s not really a New Hampshire person. He’s a politician from Massachusetts.”

Outside after a breakfast of corned beef hash and eggs, Brown acknowledged the challenge.

“Do I have the best credentials? Probably not. ’Cause, you know, whatever. But I have long and strong ties to this state,” he told the Associated Press. “People know.” Brown spent the first year and a half of his life living in New Hampshire before his family moved to Massachusetts.

Brown’s residency already plays prominently in his quest to defeat Democratic incumbent Sen. Jeanne Shaheen this fall. The stakes are high in New Hampshire and Washington, D.C., where Republicans are competing to gain six seats they need to win the Senate majority and transform the last two years of President Obama’s term.

Shaheen had been expected to cruise to re-election until Brown hinted at stepping into the race this month, giving the GOP a high-profile challenger with national fundraising appeal and a moderate political philosophy expected to play well among local voters.

Brown became a New Hampshire registered voter 13 weeks ago, according to the Rye town clerk.

He and his wife moved to their 1,700-square foot Seacoast vacation home in late December. The recent move was common knowledge inside the diners he visited over the weekend as part of a “Main Streets and Living Rooms” listening tour he launched about a week ago.

Inside the Red Arrow, Brown claimed a stool at the counter next to Pratt. As he waited for his breakfast, Pratt vowed not to vote for Shaheen. But she also pointedly questioned Brown’s devotion to New Hampshire. Behind him, 71-year-old Manchester resident Connie Antoniou whispered, “I wish the Massachusetts people would stay in Massachusetts.”

Brown told Pratt that “carpetbagger is a derogatory term” in New Hampshire given that roughly 60 percent of its people were born elsewhere, including the current and former Democratic governors. Gov. Maggie Hassan moved to the state in 1989. Shaheen, who was born in Missouri, has lived in New Hampshire for more than 40 years.

“Sen. Shaheen is not from here, but apparently it’s a problem with me?” Brown asked during a brief interview outside the diner.

Brown’s parents were stationed at New Hampshire’s Pease Air Force Base before he was born. He was delivered at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard and moved as a toddler to Massachusetts, where he spent most of his life. His mother and sister live in New Hampshire. While growing up, Brown often visited his grandparents on the Seacoast, where he bought a modest vacation home in 1993.

New Hampshire and Massachusetts have a complicated relationship.

They share a state line, professional sports teams and a major media market, but there are traces of resentment among some New Hampshire natives. Thousands of Massachusetts residents moved into New Hampshire in recent years, drawn by lower taxes and cheaper real estate. The migration helped give Democrats a slight voter registration advantage, although the state is considered far more balanced politically than solidly Democratic Massachusetts.

One of the original Tea Party favorites, Brown shocked the nation by winning the special election to replace Massachusetts Sen. Ted Kennedy in 2010. He was soundly defeated by Democratic Sen. Elizabeth Warren in 2012.

Moving to New Hampshire, Brown faces daunting historical challenges.

Just two people have served multiple states in the U.S. Senate. The most recent was elected in 1879, said Betty Koed, an associate historian for the U.S. Senate.

Former senator James Shields actually served three states in the middle of the 19th century: Illinois, Minnesota and Missouri. Sen. Waitman Willey served Virginia and then West Virginia once it became a state during the Civil War.

“There was a lot of mobility in the wake of the Civil War,” Koed said. “It’s a very different electoral environment than it was in the 19th century.”

Brown’s camp privately acknowledges that residency will be a factor for some voters, but expects concerns to dissipate after he spends more time in the state. If nothing else, Brown is known as a tireless campaigner who connects well with voters. He plans to add thousands more miles campaigning across the state to the 285,000 already on his GMC Canyon.

With a film crew in tow to gather footage for campaign ads, Brown made eight stops Saturday alone.

He made his first visit to the Tilt’n Diner, which was crowded with Massachusetts tourists passing through and recent transplants.

Brown chuckled when 39-year-old Christine Kalinowski told him she was from “Southie,” or South Boston. She said she moved to New Hampshire just a few months ago, like him.

“I voted for him before,” she said, “and I’d definitely vote for him again.”

FACTS! FACTS! FACTS! What city was this you lived in where they turned hoses on you and you couldn't eat at the lunch counter, not because you were African American but because you were poor and dark? And how old were you in the 60's anyway? You are right, I didn't live it even though I also was poor (but not dark) but I saw what life was like for blacks in 1966 So. Carolina and it gave me a life long empathy for their plight. I have never seen in any f the posts by you or gwtw or itsa or sail any empathy for anyone but people like yourselves.

You actually think that someone who speaks to me like you do would actually think I would volunteer any personal information to you? Especially race. I did not just fall off the turnip wagon. I know what you do with any info that you are provided with. I have seen you do it to folks. You assume, name call and pretty much get a pass from the moderator here. Yeah you do. You have no idea about anybody. Yet you think you do. But then again you are a Progressive, so being uninformed is how you roll. Basically you use this forum to attack people.

Rabbit you are a hypocrite. You can't even say what city you were in? What is personal about that? I think you have bee caught in your own trap.

Name call till the cows come home Tillie, at some point the only folks who will respond to you are the ones who agree with you. Basically that is what you want anyway. You have no desire to discuss. Basically you just want validation from others that think like you do. That way you convince yourself that there is only one side to everything, the side your on. I guess you never heard the saying that things are always shades of gray, not black and white. Or the term tunnel vision.

Rabbit, I am quite willing to discuss. You said you knew about racial discrimination because of your poverty and dark skin. I am sorry but I find that is a ridiculous statement to be offered without any proof. You definitely would never accept a remark like that from me without more info. As for the Moderator if she can put up with BPR's 10 repetitive rants per day she can stand me. You are pretty good at name calling yourself, maybe you should reread your own posts. As for the "forum" do you really think GWTW harping on Phelps being a Democrat for 4 days is a discussion?

lifelong democrat...

You discuss nothing Tillie unless it is with a person who agrees with you. With them you champion their opinions. If a poster with an R after their name gives you info about their childhood, anything personal per say, you trash them. If that same person had an D after their name and gave the same info you would praise them. Basically this means to me you believe anybody that disagrees with you is a liar. That is not discussing. So even though you stated you would ignore me and did not, I have decided to ignore you. So this is my last post to you. Like I did with the Fish when he was posting here, I voted him off the island. Same for you. You will not have RabbitNH to kick around anymore. I am sure the other posters will be relieved that I will no longer allow you to play your bait and switch game with me. I like to discuss, you do not.

Best news I have had today, Rabbit. Everything you said in your post is a lie or to be kinder maybe the way you see it. You told me I am not the moderator but you seem to feel you are "forum" boss deciding who to throw off the island. You and Itsa have a lot in common. You throw out these statements and then when asked to elaborate you get all hissy and refuse to answer. I don't want to know any personal details about you, I only know you by your posts and you yourself seem to like to put a lot of info out there as say your vacation plans, your gambling preferences, etc., Who cares sounds more like stuff for facebook. Itsa your buddy is the one who is always trying to probe my identity. I don't interact with anyone of the so called liberals on here like you conservatives do. It is like a love fest. "I agree. I agree, I agree". Why don't you all go on a conservative web site if you just want agreement on all your views? I did try to ignore you, Bunny, but when I posted a reply to GWTW or any of your other cohorts, you called me out by name and that I had to answer. So please ignore me, and don't answer to "Tillie" again. Enjoy your trip to NYC, hope the weather warms up for you.

Not true bunny. Tillie and I have had our discussions on this forum concerning issues we don't see eye to eye on.

Evidently we know enough for you to avoid addressing what we say and prove us wrong. When you are given facts, you ignore them. History is a funny thing these days it seems. How it is viewed depends where you stand politically it seems as opposed to what the historical facts are. And now many are trying to rewrite history and teach it to our kids. As far as racism goes, I most likely know a lot more about that than you do. I lived in a city, was very poor and I have dark skin. I venture to say I have experienced it first hand. Those of us that have experienced racism are disgusted to see it used for political gain.

"I lived in a city, was very poor and had dark skin". And for this you know all about racism? Have you ever had a hose turned on you, had to use a separate water fountain, not allowed to eat in restaurants or stay in hotels. I never experienced racism (like you) but I saw it first hand. You wouldn't know a fact if you tripped over it.

Yeah, I lived it not watched it. That work for ya?

I didnt know Brown was born in NH.

What happened was your Wikipedia down?

Funny you say that..here is what Wikipedia says: "Brown was born on September 12, 1959, in Kittery, Maine[4] and grew up in Wakefield, Massachusetts.[5] "...never use Wikipedia as a credible source....

Wow better not let your pal Sail hear you say that. Wiki is practically his bible of sources.

Really? I recall him claiming the exact opposite. Maybe you could back up your claim with some evidence. Shouldnt be too hard with a bible full of sources...

Tell you what, you back up the claim that he doesn't trust Wikipedia. I remember distinctly replying to one of his rants that Wikipedia is not a credible source because anyone can edit it. You and Rabbit and a few others on here don't seem to really "know" anything. It seems to be all info that you goggle. I am old enough to have lived through much of the civil rights era and. I was in So. Carolina in the 60's and saw Jim Crow first hand. It is a frightening thing to try to change history to fit your views. Better idea would be to change the future so such horrors can not be repeated.

"Well, the trouble with our liberal friends is not that they're ignorant; it's just that they know so much that isn't so." RR...and sooooo true. Your claim is 100% false. I dont need to do anything to know it. Have a nice day!

Hey, didn't BPR just use that quote yesterday or the day before? You guys running out of material?

facts are stubborn things....

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