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Lawyers who argued against Prop 8 to speak in Concord May 17

  • Attorneys David Boies, and Theodore Olson, address members of the media outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Tuesday, March 26, 2013. The 9 justices heard arguments whether California's voter approved ban on same-sex marriage, Proposition 8, unfairly discriminates against gay and lesbians. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

    Attorneys David Boies, and Theodore Olson, address members of the media outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Tuesday, March 26, 2013. The 9 justices heard arguments whether California's voter approved ban on same-sex marriage, Proposition 8, unfairly discriminates against gay and lesbians. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

  • Attorneys David Boies, and Theodore Olson, address members of the media outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Tuesday, March 26, 2013. The 9 justices heard arguments whether California's voter approved ban on same-sex marriage, Proposition 8, unfairly discriminates against gay and lesbians. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

    Attorneys David Boies, and Theodore Olson, address members of the media outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Tuesday, March 26, 2013. The 9 justices heard arguments whether California's voter approved ban on same-sex marriage, Proposition 8, unfairly discriminates against gay and lesbians. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

  • Attorneys David Boies, and Theodore Olson, address members of the media outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Tuesday, March 26, 2013. The 9 justices heard arguments whether California's voter approved ban on same-sex marriage, Proposition 8, unfairly discriminates against gay and lesbians. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
  • Attorneys David Boies, and Theodore Olson, address members of the media outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Tuesday, March 26, 2013. The 9 justices heard arguments whether California's voter approved ban on same-sex marriage, Proposition 8, unfairly discriminates against gay and lesbians. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Two nationally renowned attorneys who went before the U.S. Supreme Court yesterday to argue against California’s ban on gay marriage will appear at a free event in Concord this May at the Capitol Center for the Arts.

Theodore Olson and David Boies, who once were on opposite sides of the case that decided the 2000 presidential election, argued yesterday against Proposition 8, the gay-marriage ban that was narrowly approved by California voters in 2008.

They will discuss the gay-marriage case – Hollingsworth v. Perry – and their careers with Laura Knoy, host of New Hampshire Public Radio’s The Exchange. The event, which begins at 6 p.m. May 17 at the Capitol Center, is free but seats must be reserved through the venue’s website at ccanh.com or by calling 225-1111.

Their appearance in Concord is part of the Constitutionally Speaking series “How Does the Constitution Keep Up with the Times?” Constitutionally Speaking is a collaboration of the N.H. Supreme Court Society, the N.H. Humanities Council and the UNH School of Law that aims to promote “meaningful civics education in New Hampshire schools and spirited, yet civil, dialogue about the Nation’s founding document.” More information about that project is available at constitutionallyspeakingnh.com.

In 2010, both Olson and Boies were included among Time magazine’s list of 100 Most Influential People in the World. Olson, who was U.S. solicitor general from 2001 to 2004, is a partner in the Washington, D.C., office of Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher. Boies is chairman of Boies, Schiller and Flexner.

Break down the votes in CA for Prop 8 and it was Hispanics and Blacks that got it passed. Nobody talks about this. Folks in the US are all about democracy in other countries, but when a state has a vote and they do not like the outcome of that vote, they look to the Govt to step in and dictate to the folks what they should do. Is this democracy?

Sometimes elections can turn into a "tyranny of the majority." That's why we have constitutional protections of individual rights, 3 branches of government with separate powers and why the Founders purposely set up a bicameral legislature with a populist lower branch, and a more deliberative upper branch.

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