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More than 100 killed by typhoon in Philippines

  • This image provided by the U.S. Naval Research Lab shows Typhoon Haiyan taken by the NEXSAT satellite Thursday Nov. 7, 2013 at 2:30 a.m. EDT. Gorvernment forecasters said Thursday that Typhoon Haiyan was packing sustained winds of 215 kilometers (134 miles) per hour and ferocious gusts of 250 kph (155 mph) and could pick up strength over the Pacific Ocean before it slams into the eastern Philippine province of Eastern Samar on Friday. (AP Photo/US Naval Research Lab)

    This image provided by the U.S. Naval Research Lab shows Typhoon Haiyan taken by the NEXSAT satellite Thursday Nov. 7, 2013 at 2:30 a.m. EDT. Gorvernment forecasters said Thursday that Typhoon Haiyan was packing sustained winds of 215 kilometers (134 miles) per hour and ferocious gusts of 250 kph (155 mph) and could pick up strength over the Pacific Ocean before it slams into the eastern Philippine province of Eastern Samar on Friday. (AP Photo/US Naval Research Lab)

  • A house is engulfed by the storm surge brought about by powerful typhoon Haiyan that hit Legazpi city, Albay province Friday Nov.8, 2013 about 520 kilometers ( 325 miles) south of Manila, Philippines. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the most powerful typhoons ever recorded slammed into the Philippines on Friday, setting off landslides, knocking out power in one entire province and cutting communications in the country's central region of island provinces. (AP Photo/Nelson Salting)

    A house is engulfed by the storm surge brought about by powerful typhoon Haiyan that hit Legazpi city, Albay province Friday Nov.8, 2013 about 520 kilometers ( 325 miles) south of Manila, Philippines. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the most powerful typhoons ever recorded slammed into the Philippines on Friday, setting off landslides, knocking out power in one entire province and cutting communications in the country's central region of island provinces. (AP Photo/Nelson Salting)

  • A house is engulfed by the storm surge brought about by powerful typhoon Haiyan that hit Legazpi city, Albay province Friday Nov.8, 2013 about 520 kilometers ( 325 miles) south of Manila, Philippines. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the most powerful typhoons ever recorded slammed into the Philippines on Friday, setting off landslides, knocking out power in one entire province and cutting communications in the country's central region of island provinces. (AP Photo/Nelson Salting)

    A house is engulfed by the storm surge brought about by powerful typhoon Haiyan that hit Legazpi city, Albay province Friday Nov.8, 2013 about 520 kilometers ( 325 miles) south of Manila, Philippines. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the most powerful typhoons ever recorded slammed into the Philippines on Friday, setting off landslides, knocking out power in one entire province and cutting communications in the country's central region of island provinces. (AP Photo/Nelson Salting)

  • A house is engulfed by the storm surge brought about by powerful typhoon Haiyan that hit Legazpi city, Albay province Friday Nov.8, 2013 about 520 kilometers ( 325 miles) south of Manila, Philippines. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the most powerful typhoons ever recorded slammed into the Philippines on Friday, setting off landslides, knocking out power in one entire province and cutting communications in the country's central region of island provinces. (AP Photo/Nelson Salting)

    A house is engulfed by the storm surge brought about by powerful typhoon Haiyan that hit Legazpi city, Albay province Friday Nov.8, 2013 about 520 kilometers ( 325 miles) south of Manila, Philippines. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the most powerful typhoons ever recorded slammed into the Philippines on Friday, setting off landslides, knocking out power in one entire province and cutting communications in the country's central region of island provinces. (AP Photo/Nelson Salting)

  • This image provided by NASA shows Typhoon Haiyan taken by the Aqua satellite Friday, Nov. 8, 2013, at 12:15 a.m. EST as it passed over the Philippines. One of the strongest storms to ever make landfall slammed into the central Philippines Friday, forcing tens of thousands to flee their homes, knocked out power and communications but appeared to spare the country from a major catastrophe officials said. (AP Photo/NASA)

    This image provided by NASA shows Typhoon Haiyan taken by the Aqua satellite Friday, Nov. 8, 2013, at 12:15 a.m. EST as it passed over the Philippines. One of the strongest storms to ever make landfall slammed into the central Philippines Friday, forcing tens of thousands to flee their homes, knocked out power and communications but appeared to spare the country from a major catastrophe officials said. (AP Photo/NASA)

  • Debris litter the road by the coastal village in Legazpi city following a storm surge brought about by powerful Typhoon Haiyan in Albay province Friday, Nov. 8, 2013, about 520 kilometers ( 325 miles) south of Manila, Philippines. The strongest typhoon this year slammed into the central Philippines on Friday, setting off landslides and knocking out power and communication lines in several provinces. (AP Photo/Nelson Salting)

    Debris litter the road by the coastal village in Legazpi city following a storm surge brought about by powerful Typhoon Haiyan in Albay province Friday, Nov. 8, 2013, about 520 kilometers ( 325 miles) south of Manila, Philippines. The strongest typhoon this year slammed into the central Philippines on Friday, setting off landslides and knocking out power and communication lines in several provinces. (AP Photo/Nelson Salting)

  • Residents sift through the shoreline amidst a storm surge brought about by powerful typhoon Haiyan at Legazpi city, Albay province about 520 kilometers ( 325 miles) south of Manila, Philippines Friday Nov. 8, 2013. Typhoon Haiyan,  one of the most powerful typhoons ever recorded slammed into the Philippines on Friday, setting off landslides, knocking out power in one entire province and cutting communications in the country's central region of island provinces.(AP Photo/Nelson Salting)

    Residents sift through the shoreline amidst a storm surge brought about by powerful typhoon Haiyan at Legazpi city, Albay province about 520 kilometers ( 325 miles) south of Manila, Philippines Friday Nov. 8, 2013. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the most powerful typhoons ever recorded slammed into the Philippines on Friday, setting off landslides, knocking out power in one entire province and cutting communications in the country's central region of island provinces.(AP Photo/Nelson Salting)

  • Huge waves brought about by powerful typhoon Haiyan hit the shoreline in Legazpi city, Albay province Friday, Nov. 8, 2013 about 520 kilometers ( 325 miles) south of Manila, Philippines. Typhoon Haiyan,  one of the most powerful typhoons ever recorded slammed into the Philippines on Friday, setting off landslides, knocking out power in one entire province and cutting communications in the country's central region of island provinces. (AP Photo/Nelson Salting)

    Huge waves brought about by powerful typhoon Haiyan hit the shoreline in Legazpi city, Albay province Friday, Nov. 8, 2013 about 520 kilometers ( 325 miles) south of Manila, Philippines. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the most powerful typhoons ever recorded slammed into the Philippines on Friday, setting off landslides, knocking out power in one entire province and cutting communications in the country's central region of island provinces. (AP Photo/Nelson Salting)

  • Huge waves brought about by powerful typhoon Haiyan hit the shoreline in Legazpi city, Albay province Friday, Nov. 8, 2013 about 520 kilometers ( 325 miles) south of Manila, Philippines. Typhoon Haiyan,  one of the most powerful typhoons ever recorded slammed into the Philippines on Friday, setting off landslides, knocking out power in one entire province and cutting communications in the country's central region of island provinces. (AP Photo/Nelson Salting)

    Huge waves brought about by powerful typhoon Haiyan hit the shoreline in Legazpi city, Albay province Friday, Nov. 8, 2013 about 520 kilometers ( 325 miles) south of Manila, Philippines. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the most powerful typhoons ever recorded slammed into the Philippines on Friday, setting off landslides, knocking out power in one entire province and cutting communications in the country's central region of island provinces. (AP Photo/Nelson Salting)

  • A man reinforces his house with banana stalks as powerful typhoon Haiyan hits Legazpi city, Albay province, about 520 kilometers (325 miles) south of Manila, Philippines Friday, Nov. 8, 2013. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the most powerful typhoons ever recorded, slammed into the Philippines on Friday, setting off landslides, knocking out power in one entire province and cutting communications in the country's central region of island provinces. (AP Photo/Nelson Salting)

    A man reinforces his house with banana stalks as powerful typhoon Haiyan hits Legazpi city, Albay province, about 520 kilometers (325 miles) south of Manila, Philippines Friday, Nov. 8, 2013. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the most powerful typhoons ever recorded, slammed into the Philippines on Friday, setting off landslides, knocking out power in one entire province and cutting communications in the country's central region of island provinces. (AP Photo/Nelson Salting)

  • This image provided by the U.S. Naval Research Lab shows Typhoon Haiyan taken by the NEXSAT satellite Thursday Nov. 7, 2013 at 2:30 a.m. EDT. Gorvernment forecasters said Thursday that Typhoon Haiyan was packing sustained winds of 215 kilometers (134 miles) per hour and ferocious gusts of 250 kph (155 mph) and could pick up strength over the Pacific Ocean before it slams into the eastern Philippine province of Eastern Samar on Friday. (AP Photo/US Naval Research Lab)
  • A house is engulfed by the storm surge brought about by powerful typhoon Haiyan that hit Legazpi city, Albay province Friday Nov.8, 2013 about 520 kilometers ( 325 miles) south of Manila, Philippines. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the most powerful typhoons ever recorded slammed into the Philippines on Friday, setting off landslides, knocking out power in one entire province and cutting communications in the country's central region of island provinces. (AP Photo/Nelson Salting)
  • A house is engulfed by the storm surge brought about by powerful typhoon Haiyan that hit Legazpi city, Albay province Friday Nov.8, 2013 about 520 kilometers ( 325 miles) south of Manila, Philippines. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the most powerful typhoons ever recorded slammed into the Philippines on Friday, setting off landslides, knocking out power in one entire province and cutting communications in the country's central region of island provinces. (AP Photo/Nelson Salting)
  • A house is engulfed by the storm surge brought about by powerful typhoon Haiyan that hit Legazpi city, Albay province Friday Nov.8, 2013 about 520 kilometers ( 325 miles) south of Manila, Philippines. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the most powerful typhoons ever recorded slammed into the Philippines on Friday, setting off landslides, knocking out power in one entire province and cutting communications in the country's central region of island provinces. (AP Photo/Nelson Salting)
  • This image provided by NASA shows Typhoon Haiyan taken by the Aqua satellite Friday, Nov. 8, 2013, at 12:15 a.m. EST as it passed over the Philippines. One of the strongest storms to ever make landfall slammed into the central Philippines Friday, forcing tens of thousands to flee their homes, knocked out power and communications but appeared to spare the country from a major catastrophe officials said. (AP Photo/NASA)
  • Debris litter the road by the coastal village in Legazpi city following a storm surge brought about by powerful Typhoon Haiyan in Albay province Friday, Nov. 8, 2013, about 520 kilometers ( 325 miles) south of Manila, Philippines. The strongest typhoon this year slammed into the central Philippines on Friday, setting off landslides and knocking out power and communication lines in several provinces. (AP Photo/Nelson Salting)
  • Residents sift through the shoreline amidst a storm surge brought about by powerful typhoon Haiyan at Legazpi city, Albay province about 520 kilometers ( 325 miles) south of Manila, Philippines Friday Nov. 8, 2013. Typhoon Haiyan,  one of the most powerful typhoons ever recorded slammed into the Philippines on Friday, setting off landslides, knocking out power in one entire province and cutting communications in the country's central region of island provinces.(AP Photo/Nelson Salting)
  • Huge waves brought about by powerful typhoon Haiyan hit the shoreline in Legazpi city, Albay province Friday, Nov. 8, 2013 about 520 kilometers ( 325 miles) south of Manila, Philippines. Typhoon Haiyan,  one of the most powerful typhoons ever recorded slammed into the Philippines on Friday, setting off landslides, knocking out power in one entire province and cutting communications in the country's central region of island provinces. (AP Photo/Nelson Salting)
  • Huge waves brought about by powerful typhoon Haiyan hit the shoreline in Legazpi city, Albay province Friday, Nov. 8, 2013 about 520 kilometers ( 325 miles) south of Manila, Philippines. Typhoon Haiyan,  one of the most powerful typhoons ever recorded slammed into the Philippines on Friday, setting off landslides, knocking out power in one entire province and cutting communications in the country's central region of island provinces. (AP Photo/Nelson Salting)
  • A man reinforces his house with banana stalks as powerful typhoon Haiyan hits Legazpi city, Albay province, about 520 kilometers (325 miles) south of Manila, Philippines Friday, Nov. 8, 2013. Typhoon Haiyan, one of the most powerful typhoons ever recorded, slammed into the Philippines on Friday, setting off landslides, knocking out power in one entire province and cutting communications in the country's central region of island provinces. (AP Photo/Nelson Salting)

One of the strongest storms on record has killed more than 100 people and injured another 100 in the central Philippines before sweeping west toward Vietnam yesterday, still packing destructive winds capable of blowing away houses and uprooting trees.

Capt. John Andrews, deputy director general of the Civil Aviation Authority of the Philippines, said he had received “reliable information” from his staff describing the death and destruction Typhoon Haiyan wrecked in Tacloban city on Leyte Island, about 360 miles southwest of Manila, where the storm made landfall yesterday.

He told the Associated Press that more than 100 bodies were lying in the streets and another 100 were injured.

He said messages from civil aviation authorities in Tacloban to the capital, Manila, had to be relayed through another airport in the central Philippines once every five hours to conserve radio batteries.

The Philippine television station GMA reported its news team saw 11 bodies, including that of a child, washed ashore yesterday and 20 more bodies at a pier in Tacloban hours after the typhoon ripped through the coastal city.

At least 20 more bodies were taken to a church in nearby Palo town that was used as an evacuation center but had to be abandoned when its roofs were blown away, the TV network reported. TV images showed howling winds peeling off tin roof sheets during heavy rain.

Ferocious winds felled large branches and snapped coconut trees. A man was shown carrying the body of his 6-year-old daughter who drowned, and another image showed vehicles piled up in debris.

Nearly 800,000 people were forced to flee their homes, and damage was believed to be extensive.

Weather officials said Haiyan had sustained winds of 147 mph with gusts of 170 mph when it made landfall. By those measurements, Haiyan would be comparable to a strong Category 4 hurricane in the U.S., nearly in the top category, a 5.

Hurricanes, cyclones and typhoons are the same thing. They are just called different names in different parts of the world.

The typhoon’s sustained winds weakened early today to 109 mph with gusts of up to 131 mph as it blew farther away from the Philippines toward Vietnam.

In Vietnam, state media reported that several central provinces began evacuating some 300,000 people from high-risk areas. The typhoon was expected to make landfall in the central region tomorrow morning.

Because of cut-off communications in the Philippines, it was impossible to know the full extent of casualties and damage. Officially, four people had been listed as dead before the latest information from Tacloban came in.

Southern Leyte Gov. Roger Mercado said the typhoon ripped roofs off houses and triggered landslides that blocked roads.

The dense clouds and heavy rains made the day seem almost as dark as night, he said.

“When you’re faced with such a scenario, you can only pray, and pray and pray,” Mercado told the Associated Press by telephone, adding that mayors in the province had not called in to report any major damage.

“I hope that means they were spared and not the other way around,” he said. “My worst fear is there will be massive loss of lives and property.”

Eduardo del Rosario, head of the disaster response agency, said the speed at which the typhoon sliced through the central islands — 40 kph (25 mph) — helped prevent its 600-kilometer (375-mile) band of rain clouds from dumping enough of their load to overflow waterways. Flooding from heavy rains is often the main cause of deaths from typhoons.

“It has helped that the typhoon blew very fast in terms of preventing lots of casualties,” regional military commander Lt. Gen. Roy Deveraturda said. He said the massive evacuation of villagers before the storm also saved many lives.

Legacy Comments10

I think you may be incorrect. The sustained winds were measured at 195 MPH and the highest measurement revealed 235 MPH winds with a 300 mile span. It moved very quickly and therefore was not as deadly as expected. I just read that last night on several sites.

"By those measurements, Haiyan would be comparable to a strong Category 4 hurricane in the U.S., nearly in the top category, a 5."...Hardly one of the strongest storms on record. Camille was much stronger. Remember...all the data about this storm before it made landfall were "estimated" no plane flew into the eyewall to take measurements.

Katrina had had max force winds 100 miles out....... this one only 50 miles out. This storm did not come close to lowest millibar pressure...... but sensationalist media captured the low information minds

What is with you? What is your point? When people die in a storm, what does it matter if it is cat 4, 5 or 10? You are so unfeeling and uncaring, that I really am thankful that people like you aren't around when help is needed in disasters.

What does it matter? Then why dont you complain to the AP for printing the Cat # of the storm....after all, why should it matter if people are dying?

I think she's trying to suggest that the "Obama typhoon machine" was turned on by someone in D.C. and that's why we have this tragedy.

What's with GWTW is his/her determination to deny that extreme weather events of any kind might be increasing in intensity/severity or frequency, for to acknowledge that such events are happening would be a tacit admission that the climate might, just might be warming. Of course, there is already ample evidence of that, but so long as there is a shred of doubt to latch on to, or when any predictions go awry, why, that just proves to them that the science and the scientists have got it all wrong, and that global warming must be hokum. To point out that the Carpers' conclusion doesn't follow from the evidence is a waste of time. But in the interests of factual accuracy, their misleading and frequently false posts always deserve a response.

Haiyan was measured as a Category 5 storm when it was 130 miles from the Phillipines--with winds in excess of 160 mph. When it made landfall, wind speeds had dropped sufficient to make it a Category 4 storm. http://phys.org/news/2013-11-nasa-heavy-super-typhoon-haiyan-eye.html

Measured? You mean estimated. Again, no plane flew into the eyewall, and as far as I know, no one has measured the pressure. So, the statement "strongest storm to make landfall"...is still either Camille, Andrew, or the unnamed hurricane of 1935.

Not according to the scientists who measure/estimate these storms. You can parse it however you wish, and with your oft-demonstated ability to split hairs, I'm sure you'll continue to do so. This link says Haiyan was still Cat 5 when it struck Leyte. http://www.realclearscience.com/articles/2013/11/11/how_we_measured_historys_strongest_hurricane_108343.html

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