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PHOTOS: Combustion turbines help power during peak demand at PSNH’s Merrimack Station in Bow

  • One of the two combustion turbines at Public Service of New Hampshire's Merrimack Station in Bow, the structure on the right, spent most of Thursday, January 23, 2014, humming as it used aviation fuel to operate and provide power to homes in the region. In what PSNH described as unusual for a system that runs between 10-20 hours a year, the turbines were turned on to help fill an energy demand for the day that was higher than usual due to a shortage of natural gas on top of high prices. They are rarely used because they are expensive to run. "It is akin to using your emergency generator to power your home full time," said Martin Murray, spokesman for PSNH, about the units, which combined can produce 40 megawatts of energy, enough to power between 30,000-40,000 homes. <br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

    One of the two combustion turbines at Public Service of New Hampshire's Merrimack Station in Bow, the structure on the right, spent most of Thursday, January 23, 2014, humming as it used aviation fuel to operate and provide power to homes in the region. In what PSNH described as unusual for a system that runs between 10-20 hours a year, the turbines were turned on to help fill an energy demand for the day that was higher than usual due to a shortage of natural gas on top of high prices. They are rarely used because they are expensive to run. "It is akin to using your emergency generator to power your home full time," said Martin Murray, spokesman for PSNH, about the units, which combined can produce 40 megawatts of energy, enough to power between 30,000-40,000 homes.
    (ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

  • In one small part of the control room at the Public Service of New Hampshire's Merrimack Station, a ticker on the wall tracking the price of electricty is next to the panel that controls the combustion turbines. <br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

    In one small part of the control room at the Public Service of New Hampshire's Merrimack Station, a ticker on the wall tracking the price of electricty is next to the panel that controls the combustion turbines.

    (ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

  • One of the two combustion turbines at Public Service of New Hampshire's Merrimack Station in Bow, the structure on the right, spent most of Thursday, January 23, 2014, humming as it used aviation fuel to operate and provide power to homes in the region. In what PSNH described as unusual for a system that runs between 10-20 hours a year, the turbines were turned on to help fill an energy demand for the day that was higher than usual due to a shortage of natural gas on top of high prices. They are rarely used because they are expensive to run. "It is akin to using your emergency generator to power your home full time," said Martin Murray, spokesman for PSNH, about the units, which combined can produce 40 megawatts of energy, enough to power between 30,000-40,000 homes. <br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)
  • In one small part of the control room at the Public Service of New Hampshire's Merrimack Station, a ticker on the wall tracking the price of electricty is next to the panel that controls the combustion turbines. <br/><br/>(ANDREA MORALES / Monitor staff)

One of the two combustion turbines at Public Service of New Hampshire’s Merrimack Station in Bow, the structure on the right, spent most of yesterday humming as it used jet fuel to operate and provide power to homes in the region. In what PSNH described as unusual for a system that normally runs 10-20 hours a year, the turbines were turned on to help fill a higher-than-normal energy demand due to a shortage of natural gas on top of high prices. The turbines are rarely used because they are expensive to run. “It is akin to using your emergency generator to power your home full time,” said Martin Murray, spokesman for PSNH, about the two units, which combined can produce 40 megawatts of energy, enough to power between 30,000 and 40,000 homes.

Legacy Comments2

How many millions does NH pay to psnh of CT each year for "Return On Generation Assets" so they can run for a few hours a year? It probably makes solar power cheaper.

So we run jet fuel generators to send electricity to CT and other NE states now?

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