Cloudy
48°
Cloudy
Hi 57° | Lo 34°

PHOTOS: HyperGlobe technology at McAuliffe

  • Tony Giunta, senior client manager at Nobis, an engineering firm with a location in Concord, listens to a presentation by Bill Horn, chief strategy officer and board member of iGlobe, inside the planetarium at the McAuliffe-Shepard Discovery Center on Tuesday afternoon, March 4, 2014. iGlobe is a Franklin-based company that produces spherical displays, projecting images and videos on a 3D model called a HyperGlobe. The company recently partnered with Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) researchers to educate students and the general public on climate change and asked people at the presentation for feedback about making learning with the Hyperglobe more intuitive.<br/><br/>(JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff)

    Tony Giunta, senior client manager at Nobis, an engineering firm with a location in Concord, listens to a presentation by Bill Horn, chief strategy officer and board member of iGlobe, inside the planetarium at the McAuliffe-Shepard Discovery Center on Tuesday afternoon, March 4, 2014. iGlobe is a Franklin-based company that produces spherical displays, projecting images and videos on a 3D model called a HyperGlobe. The company recently partnered with Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) researchers to educate students and the general public on climate change and asked people at the presentation for feedback about making learning with the Hyperglobe more intuitive.

    (JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff)

  • Students from the Bement School in Deerfield, Massachusetts, from left, Neil Nie and Robert Stark, along with science teacher Martha Price, talk with Matt Lalley, president of iGlobe, following a presentation at the McAuliffe-Shepard Discovery Center on Tuesday afternoon, March 4, 2014. iGlobe is a Franklin-based company that produces spherical displays, projecting images and videos on a 3D model called a HyperGlobe. The company recently partnered with Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) researchers to educate students and the general public on climate change and asked people at the presentation for feedback about making learning with the Hyperglobe more intuitive.<br/><br/>(JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff)

    Students from the Bement School in Deerfield, Massachusetts, from left, Neil Nie and Robert Stark, along with science teacher Martha Price, talk with Matt Lalley, president of iGlobe, following a presentation at the McAuliffe-Shepard Discovery Center on Tuesday afternoon, March 4, 2014. iGlobe is a Franklin-based company that produces spherical displays, projecting images and videos on a 3D model called a HyperGlobe. The company recently partnered with Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) researchers to educate students and the general public on climate change and asked people at the presentation for feedback about making learning with the Hyperglobe more intuitive.

    (JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff)

  • Tony Giunta, senior client manager at Nobis, an engineering firm with a location in Concord, listens to a presentation by Bill Horn, chief strategy officer and board member of iGlobe, inside the planetarium at the McAuliffe-Shepard Discovery Center on Tuesday afternoon, March 4, 2014. iGlobe is a Franklin-based company that produces spherical displays, projecting images and videos on a 3D model called a HyperGlobe. The company recently partnered with Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) researchers to educate students and the general public on climate change and asked people at the presentation for feedback about making learning with the Hyperglobe more intuitive.<br/><br/>(JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff)
  • Students from the Bement School in Deerfield, Massachusetts, from left, Neil Nie and Robert Stark, along with science teacher Martha Price, talk with Matt Lalley, president of iGlobe, following a presentation at the McAuliffe-Shepard Discovery Center on Tuesday afternoon, March 4, 2014. iGlobe is a Franklin-based company that produces spherical displays, projecting images and videos on a 3D model called a HyperGlobe. The company recently partnered with Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) researchers to educate students and the general public on climate change and asked people at the presentation for feedback about making learning with the Hyperglobe more intuitive.<br/><br/>(JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff)

Bill Horn, chief strategy officer and board member of iGlobe, gave a presentation inside the planetarium at the McAuliffe-Shepard Discovery Center yesterday. iGlobe is a Franklin-based company that produces spherical displays, projecting images and videos on a 3-D model called a HyperGlobe. The company recently partnered with MIT researchers to educate students and the public about climate change. At the presentation they sought feedback on making learning with the HyperGlobe more intuitive.

Legacy Comments0
There are no comments yet. Be the first!
Post a Comment

You must be registered to comment on stories. Click here to register.