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PHOTOS: Goin' on a moose hunt with N.H. Fish and Game

  • Nine-year old Cole Aldrich watches as Fish and Game wildlife biologist Rob Calvert spreads the jaws of a moose shot by his uncle Bill Austin (left) and his mother, Tammy Aldrich (above)<br/>at the Fish and Game hatchery in New Hampton;  Saturday, October 27, 2012.  Biologists extract one incisor from a moose's jaw to be sent to a lab to determine it's age. Calvert estimated this bull moose to be 3 1/2 years old by looking at its teeth.<br/><br/>(ALEXANDER COHN / Monitor staff)

    Nine-year old Cole Aldrich watches as Fish and Game wildlife biologist Rob Calvert spreads the jaws of a moose shot by his uncle Bill Austin (left) and his mother, Tammy Aldrich (above)
    at the Fish and Game hatchery in New Hampton; Saturday, October 27, 2012. Biologists extract one incisor from a moose's jaw to be sent to a lab to determine it's age. Calvert estimated this bull moose to be 3 1/2 years old by looking at its teeth.

    (ALEXANDER COHN / Monitor staff) Purchase photo reprints at PhotoExtra »

  • New Hampshire Fish and Game Wildlife Biologist Rob Calvert measures the antlers of a moose at the Fish and Game hatchery in New Hampton;  Saturday, October 27, 2012. The 690-lb. bull moose was shot by Bill Austin of Littleton and his sister, Tammy Aldrich of Whitefield in Easton. The family drove it to the nearest check station in New Hampton.  As well as checking the weight and antler size, Calvert also extracted a tooth to determine the moose's age and checked for the number of ticks in certain spots. The number of permits is roughly half of what it typically is since the mild winter  is thought to have allowed more ticks to breed, which hurt young moose's chances of survival.<br/><br/>(ALEXANDER COHN / Monitor staff)

    New Hampshire Fish and Game Wildlife Biologist Rob Calvert measures the antlers of a moose at the Fish and Game hatchery in New Hampton; Saturday, October 27, 2012. The 690-lb. bull moose was shot by Bill Austin of Littleton and his sister, Tammy Aldrich of Whitefield in Easton. The family drove it to the nearest check station in New Hampton. As well as checking the weight and antler size, Calvert also extracted a tooth to determine the moose's age and checked for the number of ticks in certain spots. The number of permits is roughly half of what it typically is since the mild winter is thought to have allowed more ticks to breed, which hurt young moose's chances of survival.

    (ALEXANDER COHN / Monitor staff) Purchase photo reprints at PhotoExtra »

  • Tammy Aldrich (center) poses with her stepmother, Linda Austin, as her husband, David Aldrich, unties the moose she and her brother, Bill Austin, shot at the Fish and Game hatchery in New Hampton;  Saturday, October 27, 2012.  The siblings were hunting in Easton and brought the moose to the check station in New Hampton since it was the closest one. The nine-day annual moose hunt ends today.<br/><br/>(ALEXANDER COHN / Monitor staff)

    Tammy Aldrich (center) poses with her stepmother, Linda Austin, as her husband, David Aldrich, unties the moose she and her brother, Bill Austin, shot at the Fish and Game hatchery in New Hampton; Saturday, October 27, 2012. The siblings were hunting in Easton and brought the moose to the check station in New Hampton since it was the closest one. The nine-day annual moose hunt ends today.

    (ALEXANDER COHN / Monitor staff) Purchase photo reprints at PhotoExtra »

  • Nine-year old Cole Aldrich watches as Fish and Game wildlife biologist Rob Calvert spreads the jaws of a moose shot by his uncle Bill Austin (left) and his mother, Tammy Aldrich (above)<br/>at the Fish and Game hatchery in New Hampton;  Saturday, October 27, 2012.  Biologists extract one incisor from a moose's jaw to be sent to a lab to determine it's age. Calvert estimated this bull moose to be 3 1/2 years old by looking at its teeth.<br/><br/>(ALEXANDER COHN / Monitor staff)
  • New Hampshire Fish and Game Wildlife Biologist Rob Calvert measures the antlers of a moose at the Fish and Game hatchery in New Hampton;  Saturday, October 27, 2012. The 690-lb. bull moose was shot by Bill Austin of Littleton and his sister, Tammy Aldrich of Whitefield in Easton. The family drove it to the nearest check station in New Hampton.  As well as checking the weight and antler size, Calvert also extracted a tooth to determine the moose's age and checked for the number of ticks in certain spots. The number of permits is roughly half of what it typically is since the mild winter  is thought to have allowed more ticks to breed, which hurt young moose's chances of survival.<br/><br/>(ALEXANDER COHN / Monitor staff)
  • Tammy Aldrich (center) poses with her stepmother, Linda Austin, as her husband, David Aldrich, unties the moose she and her brother, Bill Austin, shot at the Fish and Game hatchery in New Hampton;  Saturday, October 27, 2012.  The siblings were hunting in Easton and brought the moose to the check station in New Hampton since it was the closest one. The nine-day annual moose hunt ends today.<br/><br/>(ALEXANDER COHN / Monitor staff)

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