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N.H. News Roundup

N.H. News Roundup: SCOTUS strikes down DOMA, the final vote on medical marijuana

  • A rainbow flag hangs from the office of San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee at City Hall Wednesday, June 26, 2013.  The Supreme Court on Wednesday struck down a provision of a U.S. law denying federal benefits to married gay couples and cleared the way for the resumption of same-sex marriage in the state of California. The justices issued two 5-4 rulings in their final session of the term. One decision wiped away part of a federal anti-gay marriage law that has kept legally married same-sex couples from receiving tax, health and pension benefits. The other was a technical legal ruling that said nothing at all about same-sex marriage, but left in place a trial court's declaration that California's Proposition 8 is unconstitutional. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

    A rainbow flag hangs from the office of San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee at City Hall Wednesday, June 26, 2013. The Supreme Court on Wednesday struck down a provision of a U.S. law denying federal benefits to married gay couples and cleared the way for the resumption of same-sex marriage in the state of California. The justices issued two 5-4 rulings in their final session of the term. One decision wiped away part of a federal anti-gay marriage law that has kept legally married same-sex couples from receiving tax, health and pension benefits. The other was a technical legal ruling that said nothing at all about same-sex marriage, but left in place a trial court's declaration that California's Proposition 8 is unconstitutional. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

  • Nikolas Lemos waves a rainbow flag outside San Francisco's City Hall shortly before a Supreme Court ruling cleared the way for same-sex marriage in California on Wednesday, June 26, 2013.  The justices issued two 5-4 rulings in their final session of the term. One decision wiped away part of a federal anti-gay marriage law that has kept legally married same-sex couples from receiving tax, health and pension benefits. The other was a technical legal ruling that said nothing at all about same-sex marriage, but left in place a trial court's declaration that California's Proposition 8 is unconstitutional.  (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

    Nikolas Lemos waves a rainbow flag outside San Francisco's City Hall shortly before a Supreme Court ruling cleared the way for same-sex marriage in California on Wednesday, June 26, 2013. The justices issued two 5-4 rulings in their final session of the term. One decision wiped away part of a federal anti-gay marriage law that has kept legally married same-sex couples from receiving tax, health and pension benefits. The other was a technical legal ruling that said nothing at all about same-sex marriage, but left in place a trial court's declaration that California's Proposition 8 is unconstitutional. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

  • Domestic partners Alicia Guajardo, left, and Isabella Restrepo, both 24 of Los Angeles, kiss after the Supreme Court ruling on the Defense of Marriage Act at the offices of Equity California, the state's largest gay rights group, in West Hollywood, Calif., Wednesday, June 26, 2013.  The justices issued two 5-4 rulings in their final session of the term. One decision wiped away part of a federal anti-gay marriage law that has kept legally married same-sex couples from receiving tax, health and pension benefits. The other was a technical legal ruling that said nothing at all about same-sex marriage, but left in place a trial court's declaration that California's Proposition 8 is unconstitutional.  (AP Photo/Jason Redmond)

    Domestic partners Alicia Guajardo, left, and Isabella Restrepo, both 24 of Los Angeles, kiss after the Supreme Court ruling on the Defense of Marriage Act at the offices of Equity California, the state's largest gay rights group, in West Hollywood, Calif., Wednesday, June 26, 2013. The justices issued two 5-4 rulings in their final session of the term. One decision wiped away part of a federal anti-gay marriage law that has kept legally married same-sex couples from receiving tax, health and pension benefits. The other was a technical legal ruling that said nothing at all about same-sex marriage, but left in place a trial court's declaration that California's Proposition 8 is unconstitutional. (AP Photo/Jason Redmond)

  • California Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom, center, speaks in front of San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee, foreground second from left, after the Supreme Court cleared the way for same-sex marriage in California  at the mayor's office at City Hall in San Francisco, Wednesday, June 26, 2013. The justices issued two 5-4 rulings in their final session of the term. One decision wiped away part of a federal anti-gay marriage law that has kept legally married same-sex couples from receiving tax, health and pension benefits. The other was a technical legal ruling that said nothing at all about same-sex marriage, but left in place a trial court's declaration that California's Proposition 8 is unconstitutional.  (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

    California Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom, center, speaks in front of San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee, foreground second from left, after the Supreme Court cleared the way for same-sex marriage in California at the mayor's office at City Hall in San Francisco, Wednesday, June 26, 2013. The justices issued two 5-4 rulings in their final session of the term. One decision wiped away part of a federal anti-gay marriage law that has kept legally married same-sex couples from receiving tax, health and pension benefits. The other was a technical legal ruling that said nothing at all about same-sex marriage, but left in place a trial court's declaration that California's Proposition 8 is unconstitutional. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

  • A rainbow flag hangs from the office of San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee at City Hall Wednesday, June 26, 2013.  The Supreme Court on Wednesday struck down a provision of a U.S. law denying federal benefits to married gay couples and cleared the way for the resumption of same-sex marriage in the state of California. The justices issued two 5-4 rulings in their final session of the term. One decision wiped away part of a federal anti-gay marriage law that has kept legally married same-sex couples from receiving tax, health and pension benefits. The other was a technical legal ruling that said nothing at all about same-sex marriage, but left in place a trial court's declaration that California's Proposition 8 is unconstitutional. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
  • Nikolas Lemos waves a rainbow flag outside San Francisco's City Hall shortly before a Supreme Court ruling cleared the way for same-sex marriage in California on Wednesday, June 26, 2013.  The justices issued two 5-4 rulings in their final session of the term. One decision wiped away part of a federal anti-gay marriage law that has kept legally married same-sex couples from receiving tax, health and pension benefits. The other was a technical legal ruling that said nothing at all about same-sex marriage, but left in place a trial court's declaration that California's Proposition 8 is unconstitutional.  (AP Photo/Noah Berger)
  • Domestic partners Alicia Guajardo, left, and Isabella Restrepo, both 24 of Los Angeles, kiss after the Supreme Court ruling on the Defense of Marriage Act at the offices of Equity California, the state's largest gay rights group, in West Hollywood, Calif., Wednesday, June 26, 2013.  The justices issued two 5-4 rulings in their final session of the term. One decision wiped away part of a federal anti-gay marriage law that has kept legally married same-sex couples from receiving tax, health and pension benefits. The other was a technical legal ruling that said nothing at all about same-sex marriage, but left in place a trial court's declaration that California's Proposition 8 is unconstitutional.  (AP Photo/Jason Redmond)
  • California Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom, center, speaks in front of San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee, foreground second from left, after the Supreme Court cleared the way for same-sex marriage in California  at the mayor's office at City Hall in San Francisco, Wednesday, June 26, 2013. The justices issued two 5-4 rulings in their final session of the term. One decision wiped away part of a federal anti-gay marriage law that has kept legally married same-sex couples from receiving tax, health and pension benefits. The other was a technical legal ruling that said nothing at all about same-sex marriage, but left in place a trial court's declaration that California's Proposition 8 is unconstitutional.  (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

What an event-filled Wednesday it’s already turned out to be.

There’s crucial votes today in the Legislature, Patriots’ tight end Aaron Hernandez was arrested – and then released by the team, and the U.S. Supreme Court has struck down the federal Defense of Marriage Act.

New Hampshire allows gay marriage, but for gay couples in the Granite State, the ruling is huge. But for some, the law already did irreparable harm.

Gov. Maggie Hassan praised the court this morning when she learned about the ruling, and so did other local leaders.

Here is Justice Antonin Scalia's dissent.

In other news

∎ One of the issues the Legislature is expected to take up today is medical marijuana in the Granite State.

Dodgeball will be allowed in Windham schools, after all.

∎ One of the Boy Scouts injured in the lightning strike was from Claremont.

∎ Six people have been arrested for “doctor shopping” and prescription fraud in Rockingham and Hillsborough counties.

∎ Push poll charges against Charlie Bass have been dismissed.

∎ If yesterday’s Supreme Court ruling on the Voting Rights Act happened three months ago, New Hampshire would have been involved.

∎ A missing New Hampton kayaker was found dead in the Squamscott River.

 Declining revenues could force massive layoffs in the N.H. Department of Transportation by October 2015.

∎ Gabrielle Giffords and Mark Kelly will be visiting the Granite State next month.

∎ New Hampshire’s manufacturing climate got a mediocre grade.

∎ If you’re boating in the Granite State, watch out for loons.

∎ No. 1 New York Times bestselling author Carl Hiassen sat down with NHPR in Portsmouth.

(Have ideas for the roundup? Reach web editor Kevin Deane at 369-3302 or email him at kdeane@cmonitor.com. Follow him on Twitter, @CM_KDeane.)

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