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NASCAR

Rain washes out Sprint Cup race at Kentucky

  • Carl Edwards takes cover under an umbrella as he leaves the drivers' meeting before the NASCAR Sprint Cup auto race at Kentucky Speedway at Sparta, Ky., Saturday, June 29, 2013. (AP Photo/James Crisp)

    Carl Edwards takes cover under an umbrella as he leaves the drivers' meeting before the NASCAR Sprint Cup auto race at Kentucky Speedway at Sparta, Ky., Saturday, June 29, 2013. (AP Photo/James Crisp)

  • Crew members for Scott Riggs push his car through puddles between stations during tech inspection for the NASCAR Sprint Cup auto race at Kentucky Speedway in Sparta, Ky., Saturday, June 29, 2013. (AP Photo/James Crisp)

    Crew members for Scott Riggs push his car through puddles between stations during tech inspection for the NASCAR Sprint Cup auto race at Kentucky Speedway in Sparta, Ky., Saturday, June 29, 2013. (AP Photo/James Crisp)

  • From left, drivers Landon Cassill, Travis Kvapil and Michael McDowell share stories during a rain delay before the NASCAR Sprint Cup auto race at Kentucky Speedway in Sparta, Ky., Saturday, June 29, 2013. (AP Photo/James Crisp)

    From left, drivers Landon Cassill, Travis Kvapil and Michael McDowell share stories during a rain delay before the NASCAR Sprint Cup auto race at Kentucky Speedway in Sparta, Ky., Saturday, June 29, 2013. (AP Photo/James Crisp)

  • Fans try to stay out of the rain before the NASCAR Sprint Cup auto race at Kentucky Speedway in Sparta, Ky., Saturday, June 29, 2013. (AP Photo/Garry Jones)

    Fans try to stay out of the rain before the NASCAR Sprint Cup auto race at Kentucky Speedway in Sparta, Ky., Saturday, June 29, 2013. (AP Photo/Garry Jones)

  • Fans huddle under an umbrella in the rain before scheduled start of the NASCAR Sprint Cup auto race at Kentucky Speedway in Sparta, Ky., Saturday, June 29, 2013.  (AP Photo/Garry Jones)

    Fans huddle under an umbrella in the rain before scheduled start of the NASCAR Sprint Cup auto race at Kentucky Speedway in Sparta, Ky., Saturday, June 29, 2013. (AP Photo/Garry Jones)

  • Carl Edwards takes cover under an umbrella as he leaves the drivers' meeting before the NASCAR Sprint Cup auto race at Kentucky Speedway at Sparta, Ky., Saturday, June 29, 2013. (AP Photo/James Crisp)
  • Crew members for Scott Riggs push his car through puddles between stations during tech inspection for the NASCAR Sprint Cup auto race at Kentucky Speedway in Sparta, Ky., Saturday, June 29, 2013. (AP Photo/James Crisp)
  • From left, drivers Landon Cassill, Travis Kvapil and Michael McDowell share stories during a rain delay before the NASCAR Sprint Cup auto race at Kentucky Speedway in Sparta, Ky., Saturday, June 29, 2013. (AP Photo/James Crisp)
  • Fans try to stay out of the rain before the NASCAR Sprint Cup auto race at Kentucky Speedway in Sparta, Ky., Saturday, June 29, 2013. (AP Photo/Garry Jones)
  • Fans huddle under an umbrella in the rain before scheduled start of the NASCAR Sprint Cup auto race at Kentucky Speedway in Sparta, Ky., Saturday, June 29, 2013.  (AP Photo/Garry Jones)

Rain forced NASCAR to postpone last night’s Sprint Cup race at Kentucky Speedway until today.

The 400-mile event was rescheduled for noon. It will be broadcast on TNT.

Dale Earnhardt Jr. will start on the pole in a Chevy alongside Carl Edwards’s Ford.

It was the circuit’s first postponement since last year’s season-opening Daytona 500. The marquee event ran the following night for the first time in its history.

Today’s rescheduling creates the first day Cup race for the 1.5-mile oval after two events at night.

Showers were forecast all of yesterday around Kentucky and arrived around mid-afternoon with a heavy downpour followed by sporadic rain. NASCAR delayed the start and held out hope for a late start with jet driers on the track, but another band of rain led officials to postpone the race just after 9 p.m.

“We knew it would be touch-and-go and from early in the morning we were tracking the weather,” NASCAR spokesman Kerry Tharp said. “We dispatched the driers and they stayed out ahead of it, but the weather cells never did move out of the area and they looked like they would linger.

“It’s a 90-minute to two-hour window with the best of conditions, and once it reached around 9 p.m. and it was still raining and in the forecast, we made the decision we thought was best.”

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