Dorian still slamming eastern Canada at hurricane force

  • An unidentified man raises his arms in the winds from Hurricane Dorian along the Halifax harbor in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada, on Saturday. The Canadian Press via AP

  • A home damaged by Hurricane Dorian is surrounded by debris in Eastern Shores just outside of Marsh Harbor, Abaco Island, Bahamas, Saturday, Sept. 7, 2019. The Bahamian health ministry said helicopters and boats are on the way to help people in affected areas, though officials warned of delays because of severe flooding and limited access. (AP Photo/Fernando Llano) Fernando Llano

  • Utility poles were shipped after Hurricane Dorian moved through the area yesterday along a causeway in Nags Head, NC., Saturday, Sept. 7, 2019. (AP Photo/Steve Helber) Steve Helber

  • Destruction caused by Hurricane Dorian is seen in Eastern Shores, just outside Marsh Harbor, Abaco Island, Bahamas, Saturday, Sept. 7, 2019. The Bahamian health ministry said helicopters and boats are on the way to help people in affected areas, though officials warned of delays because of severe flooding and limited access. (AP Photo/Fernando Llano) Fernando Llano

Associated Press
Published: 9/8/2019 4:44:09 PM

The storm that has already walloped the Virgin Islands, Bahamas and North Carolina brought hurricane-force winds to far-eastern Canada on Sunday, knocking out power to hundreds of thousands of people.

Dorian hit near the city of Halifax on Saturday afternoon, ripping roofs off apartment buildings, toppling a huge construction crane and uprooting trees. There were no reported deaths in Canada, though the storm was blamed for at least 49 elsewhere along its path.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center said the post-tropical cyclone was centered about 30 miles east-southeast of Cape Whittle, Quebec, late Sunday morning. Top sustained winds had slipped to 75 mph, just above the threshold of hurricane force. It was heading to the northeast, roughly up the St. Lawrence River, at 25 mph.

Nova Scotia officials asked people in the province to stay off the roads so crews could safety remove trees and debris and restore power.

The government said that up to 700 Canadian military personnel will be fanning out across the Maritimes to help restore electricity, clear roadways and evacuate residents in flooded areas.

Nova Scotia Power Inc. chief executive Karen Hutt said there were over 400,000 Nova Scotia Power customers without power at the peak of the storm and 50,000 have since been restored. But she said some could remain without service for days.




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