Warren files name on N.H. ballot as former Mass. governor Deval Patrick tells allies he will join 2020 race 

  • Democratic presidential candidate U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., files to have her name listed on the New Hampshire primary ballot Wednesday in Concord. At left is New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner. AP

  • New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner instructs Democratic presidential candidate U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., as she files to have her name listed on the New Hampshire primary ballot, Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2019, in Concord, N.H. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa) Charles Krupa

  • Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., applauds after filing to have her name listed on the New Hampshire primary ballot, Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2019, in Concord, N.H. At left is New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa) Charles Krupa

  • Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., reacts after filing to have her name listed on the New Hampshire primary ballot, Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2019, in Concord, N.H. At left is New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa) Charles Krupa

  • Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., speaks with supporters after filing to have her name listed on the New Hampshire primary ballot, Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2019, in Concord, N.H. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa) Charles Krupa

  • FILE - In this Dec. 15, 2014, file photo, Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick speaks during an interview at his Statehouse office in Boston. Former Massachusetts Gov. Patrick is considering making a late run for the Democratic presidential nomination. That is according to people with knowledge of Patrick’s deliberations. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File) Elise Amendola

  • U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., plays a word game with Isabella Noonkester at the Merrimack Valley Day Care Service on Fruit Street in Concord after filing for the New Hampshire primary on Wednesday. GEOFF FORESTER / Monitor staff

  • U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren talks with Soloman Silverman and Amara Gagne at the Merrimack Valley Day Care Service on Fruit Street after filing for the New Hampshire Primary on Wednesday, November 13, 2019. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • Joni Silverman was a little unsure as she met U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren D-Mass. at the Merrimack Valley Day Care on Fruit Street in Concord after Warren filed for the New Hampshire Primary on Wednesday, November 15, 2019. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren plays a word game with Isabella Noonkester at the Merrimack Valley Day Care Service on Fruit Street after filing for the New Hampshire Primary on Wednesday, November 13, 2019. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • Former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick is telling allies that he will join the 2020 presidential race, according to two people familiar with his plans. AP file

  • Governor Deval Patrick speaks at the Massachusetts State Democratic Convention, held at the DCU Center in Worcester, Friday, June 13, 2014. (AP PHOTO, Steve Lanava/Worcester Telegram & Gazette) T&G Staff/STEVE LANAVA

For the Monitor
Published: 11/13/2019 6:31:15 PM

Sen. Elizabeth Warren officially filed to place her name on New Hampshire’s first-in-the-nation presidential primary ballot Wednesday, just as speculation grew that the former governor of her state would jump into the race for the Democratic nomination.

Warren – who knows former governor Deval Patrick well – told the Monitor that she hadn’t talked with him in recent days and said “no” when asked if the fellow Massachusetts Democrat’s potential entry into the already crowded race would complicate her own campaign.

Asked about his years working at the well-known investment firm Bain Capital, Warren answered “I’m not here to criticize other Democrats. I’m here to talk about why I’m running for president.”

Patrick is likely to announce his candidacy for the Democratic presidential nomination on Thursday by video or social media, CNN and the Associated Press reported. Patrick would travel to New Hampshire on Friday, to file on the last day for candidates to place their names on the state’s primary ballot.

Warren is one of the co-front-runners in the race for the Democratic presidential nomination, along with former vice president Joe Biden. And she’s part of a top-tier of candidates with Biden, Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, and South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg, in the latest public opinion polls in both New Hampshire and Iowa, which kicks off the caucus and primary nominating calendar.

Warren addressed comments this week from Democratic presidential candidate Julian Castro of Texas – who called for a re-ordering of the primary calendar as he pointed to a lack of diversity in Iowa and New Hampshire.

“I actually believe we do need to change the order of the states,” Castro said Sunday while campaigning in Iowa.

He highlighted that demographically New Hampshire and Iowa are “not reflective of the United States as a whole, certainly not reflective of the Democratic Party, and I believe that other states should have their chance. ... I don’t believe that forever we should be married to Iowa and New Hampshire going first.”

Warren didn’t agree. She pointed to Nevada, which votes after New Hampshire and has a large minority population, and South Carolina, which is the fourth state to vote and where black voters make up the majority of the Democratic presidential primary electorate.

“I’m very glad as Democrats that in February we will hear from voters or caucus-goers in four different states and those four states represent a lot of different parts of the county and a lot of different people, that it’s urban and rural, different issues,” Warren said.

As for Warren’s chances here?

A one-word answer was all that was needed.

Asked by reporters if she can win the Granite State’s first-in-the-nation contest, the Massachusetts Democrat firmly answered “yes.”

Not all White House hopefuls filing to place their names on the ballot are as emphatic about their chances.

“This is a great day for me,” Warren said. “The day when I’m officially in the race for president of the United States. Something that in a million years I wouldn’t have ever dreamed I’d end up doing. But now I’m in this fight and I’m in it all the way.”

The candidate passed through a cauldron of supporters jammed into the second-floor hallway at the State House as she arrived at the Secretary of State’s office. She was accompanied by former state senator and 2018 Democratic gubernatorial nominee Molly Kelly, attorney Ron Abramson, and state Reps. Ed Butler and Debra Altschiller as she signed the paperwork to place her name on the ballot. Later, she spoke to supporters at a rally in freezing temperatures outside the State House.

Warren was here the same day that the first public hearings kicked off by the U.S. House of Representatives in the impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump.

Warren, who in the spring became one of the first of the Democratic White House hopefuls to call for Trump’s impeachment, told reporters that “I believe it is appropriate for this impeachment inquiry to go forward. I think it should have happened earlier but we’re here now, let’s do it.”

Asked if she had been watching the testimony from the public hearing, that was being televised on the cable news networks, Warren said, “I just haven’t been able to catch up with it. Fortunately, I will catch up tonight.”

If the Democratic-controlled House votes to impeach the president, the Senate would then hold a trial which could possibly lead to Trump’s removal from office. Such a trial would probably keep Warren and the other Senate Democrats running for president off the campaign during the weeks leading up to the kickoff in Iowa and then New Hampshire of the presidential primary and caucus nominating calendar.

“I have Constitutional responsibilities. I took an oath of office, as did everyone in Congress and part of that oath of office is the basic principle that no one is above the law. That includes the president of the United States,” Warren reiterated. “And if the House goes forward and sends an impeachment over to the Senate, then I will be there for the trial.”




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