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Letter: Kavanaugh and contraception


Sunday, September 16, 2018

John Warner is wrong in the opinion piece “Kavanaugh and the return of the Comstock Act” (Monitor Forum, Sept. 13). He states that Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination threatens the “freedom of American women” and “once again puts religious-based decisions before scientific and medical knowledge.”

First, it is not just a religious opinion that abortion and contraception are wrong. No, it is based on a common cultural assumption found in our American laws since the earliest days of our republic that every person’s life has value. Modern science and medicine make it abundantly clear that the baby in the womb is indeed a life. It has a heartbeat after just three weeks, its bodily systems are in place by 10 weeks, and there is evidence that it feels pain by 20 weeks or earlier. So it is not just a blob of tissue that an abortion kills.

As for contraception, Judge Kavanaugh’s assertion that it is abortion-inducing is based on medical facts. The literature that accompanies the contraceptive pill states that if an egg is fertilized, the medication will prevent it from being implanted in the womb, thus causing it to die.

It is not obvious that something like the Comstock law would be put in place if Judge Kavanaugh takes a position on the Supreme Court. But even if it did come to that, it would make our laws less murky and a truer reflection of our common values. Freedom does not consist of the right to kill a person.

WILLIAM JUDD

Concord