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Julie Green never stopped working for others, which makes her sudden absence even more difficult

  • Melony Beebe was busy getting photos into a collage for the memorial service of Julie Green at the First Congregational Church in Concord on Wednesday. GEOFF FORESTER / Monitor staff

  • Julie Green, clinical case manager for the Concord Homeless Resource Center, gives a hug at a homeless vigil on Dec. 21, 2018. Monitor file

  • Melony Beebe was busy getting photos into a collage of for the service for Julie Green at the First Congregational Church in Concord tomorrow. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • Julie Green, clinical director of case management for the Concord Coalition to End Homelessnes at a homeless encampment near the old Concord Drive-in off of Black Hill Road in Concord on Thursday, September 9, 2021. The homeless encampment needs to cleared out by the end of the month. GEOFF FORESTER

  • Julie Green (far right), clinical case manager for the Concord Homeless Resource Center, stands during the moment of silence to honor the 58 people who died as a result of homelessness in New Hampshire this past year. Behind Green, Rodney Moody, Shannon Utter and Lois Potter remember their friends at the Homeless vigil in front of the State House on Friday, December 21, 2018. GEOFF FORESTER

  • Melony Beebe was busy getting photos into a collage of for the service for Julie Green at the First Congregational Church in Concord tomorrow. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • Julie Green, clinical director of case management for the Concord Coalition to End Homelessness looks over an abandoned tent at the homeless encampment near the old Concord Drive-in off of Black Hill Road in Concord on Thursday, September 9, 2021. The encampment needs to cleared out by the end of the month. GEOFF FORESTER

Monitor columnist
Published: 10/19/2021 4:35:43 PM

Melony Beebe had no time to talk. Not right away.

First, Beebe had to finish printing photos of Julie Green for a collage that will be on display Wednesday afternoon at the First Congregational Church.

That’s where Green will be honored in what figures to be a packed ceremony. She died of cancer last week, friends and colleagues said, just days after her diagnosis.

She was 37. She led the resource center at the Concord Coalition to End Homeless, steering “clients” toward promising paths, then following up with tough love. Now, people attached to the homeless community are numb, living in utter disbelief.

“She has been my guardian angel,” Beebe said, shortly after making her final print. “My rock. She inspires me so much.”

Beebe, homeless off and on through the years, said she’s moving into her own apartment next month. She credited Green for that.

In fact, a lot of people credited Green for a lot of things. Bottom line: this petite ball of fire never quit trying to calm rough seas. She was in charge of resources, the leader in a wide campaign – run by coalition director Ellen Groh – to find housing, jobs, food, clothing, transportation, something, anything, to put a dent in a never-ending problem.

“She never judged me,” Beebe said. “Not one day. I never felt like I was not good enough, or like she was better.”

She apparently lived her life that way, a single mom who gave at home and gave at the office. Her family members could not be reached for comment.

Groh filled in blanks. She said Green graduated from Hopkinton High School. She focused on educational studies, sociology and social work at New England College. She got a master’s degree in mental health counseling, also at NEC.

She was a caseworker for Child and Family Services, an admissions counselor at the Spaulding Youth Center, a counselor at Second Start.

Sensing a pattern?

“She touched so many people,” Groh said. “She was meeting people who were having trouble managing their behavior, who could be destructive, but she always had the passion to treat them like human beings, no matter what they were going through.”

Groh hired Green in the summer of 2018. She saw the evolution, from case manager to clinical director of case management, with a focus on the Resource Center. She was the supervisor, the policymaker, the captain that welcomed the homeless aboard the ship.

She visited three homeless encampments with COVID raging. She coordinated her efforts with the police and sheriff’s department, promoting a gentler, more patient way with which to communicate with homeless people.

“She loved it with all her heart,” Groh said. “She wanted to help these people find solutions, and she wanted to keep it all as peaceful and dignified as possible. She was good at de-escalating. She never turned her phone off. I told her she should.”

Firefighter Jeffery Stewart was Green’s boyfriend. They dated for more than a year. Their paths crossed serving the same core of people, some homeless, some addicted, while Stewart was the director of Project First (First responders Initiating Recovery, Support and Treatment).

“A beautiful woman,” Stewart said. “Her heart was incredibly generous. She knew the impact she had upon things and with the Concord community, but she was incredibly humble about it. I loved her, and she knew that way before she passed.”

Leslie Fincke, a former board member and volunteer at CCEH, saw Green’s effect firsthand. She said her dedication was palpable.

“I think Julie knew that every one of us is vulnerable,” Fincke wrote in a text, “and used her big smile, positive attitude and huge heart to help those around her feel safe and strong.”

Fincke called this a “huge, huge loss,” made worse by its suddenness. Groh said Green’s back hurt. Stewart said she had flu-like symptoms. She went to Concord Hospital on Oct. 10. She died on the 14th. No one saw it coming.

“We’re still kind of reeling,” Groh said. “This is a tender time for people who relied on Julie. She did not give up on people. Many 0f her clients, after they got into treatment, would come back and say, ‘You did not give up on me. Thank you.’ ”

That’s why Beebe made copies of those photos. The ones you’ll see on a collage Wednesday, from 2 to 3:30 p.m. at the First Congregational Church.

Green had been monitoring Beebe’s living conditions in recent months, determined to find Beebe and her 7-year-old son a home. She stashed away Beebe’s application for Section 8 Housing, knowing she’d be leaving her last apartment because the landlord had sold the building.

Beebe moves into an apartment – one side of a house on West Street – next month. There, Green’s presence will never fade.

“Her main goal the past few months was to help my son and I,” Beebe said. “She died the day we got word about the new place. Somehow, she managed to do it.”


Ray Duckler bio photo

Ray Duckler, our intrepid columnist, focuses on the Suncook Valley. He floats from topic to topic, searching for the humor or sadness or humanity in each subject. A native New Yorker, he loves the Yankees and Giants. The Red Sox and Patriots? Not so much.



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