Klobuchar seals the deal with a Henniker voter

  • U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar D-Minn. got a bit of a standing ovation as she entered her town hall at New England College in Henniker on Friday afternoon, November 23, 2019. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar D-Minn. at her town hall at New England College in Henniker on Friday afternoon, November 23, 2019. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., got a bit of a standing ovation as she entered her town hall at New England College in Henniker on Friday afternoon. GEOFF FORESTER / Monitor staff

  • U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar D-Minn. at her town hall at New England College in Henniker on Friday afternoon, November 23, 2019. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar D-Minn. at her town hall at New England College in Henniker on Friday afternoon, November 23, 2019. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar D-Minn. at her town hall at New England College in Henniker on Friday afternoon, November 23, 2019. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

For the Monitor
Published: 11/22/2019 5:34:16 PM
Modified: 11/22/2019 5:34:04 PM

Sen. Amy Klobuchar has a message for New Hampshire voters who are considering supporting her White House bid: “commit today.”

And that’s what Shelley Greenglass did on Friday, after watching the Minnesota Democrat in person at a town hall at New England College in Henniker.

“I was down to four and now I’m going to go with Amy,” Greenglass told the Monitor after the event. “I’ve always liked her. I hadn’t seen her yet.”

Greenglass said she’s seen several Democratic White House candidates, including former Vice President Joe Biden, Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, and tech entrepreneur Andrew Yang. But she emphasized that she’s backing Klobuchar in February’s first-in-the-nation presidential primary because “she’s just down to earth.”

Monique Pride of Bow, who was standing next to Greenglass in a receiving line to meet Klobuchar, said she hasn’t “completely” made up her mind. But she said that Klobuchar’s one of her favorites.

“A great speech. All of her answers were really good. I liked that,” said Pride, the wife of former Monitor editor Mike Pride. “I like that she has a great record.”

But she added that she’s also leaning towards Warren, who she was planning to go to see on Saturday. 

In an interview after the town hall with the Monitor and NHTalkradio.com, Klobuchar took aim at New Hampshire Republican Gov. Chris Sununu over a controversial state law that imposes voter residency requirements.

“That the governor did this makes no sense to me,” she emphasized. “New Hampshire has always been known as a state that wants people to vote. You’re the first primary in the nation. Why would you want to start being known as a state that makes it harder for people to vote. You want to attract young people. You don’t want to turn them away and make them think that they’re not part of this state.”

The law at issue is House Bill 1264, which was passed in 2018 by the then-Republican controlled state House and Senate and signed into law by the GOP incumbent governor. The law – which is currently being battled over in court – targets mainly out-of-state students attending New Hampshire colleges and universities, but also military personnel and medical residents stationed in the state. In the measure eventually takes effect, those out-of-staters would have to become New Hampshire residents or vote absentee in their native state.

The law is vehemently opposed by Democrats, who label it a voter suppression effort. But many Republicans, who’ve long argued that there’s voter fraud in New Hampshire, see the measure as restoring ballot integrity by making sure that only residents can vote in Granite State elections.

Sununu’s office has repeatedly pushed back against attacks from Democratic presidential contenders over the state’s voter eligibility laws.

“It is a fact that New Hampshire is the easiest state in the country to vote in,” Sununu spokesman Ben Vihstadt has said.

In Minnesota, to be eligible to vote a person must have resided in the state for 20 days immediately before Election Day.

“I don’t know the exact comparison between the states but I think that New Hampshire should actually be making it as easy as possible to vote,” she said. “It’s always been a big deal here.”




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