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Sifting through time

  • Mike Corey of Chester uses a sifting screen to separate artifacts from dirt at a New Hampshire Division of Historical Resources' archaeology field school site at Livermore Falls Recreation Area in Holderness on July 20, 2018. (ELIZABETH FRANTZ / Monitor staff) ELIZABETH FRANTZ—Monitor staff

  • Mike Corey and Brian Howe study artifacts found at a field site near Livermore Falls. ELIZABETH FRANTZ / Monitor staff

  • Mike Corey of Chester uses a sifting screen to separate artifacts from dirt at a New Hampshire Division of Historical Resources' archaeology field school site at Livermore Falls Recreation Area in Holderness on July 20, 2018. (ELIZABETH FRANTZ / Monitor staff) ELIZABETH FRANTZ—Monitor staff

  • The New Hampshire Division of Historical Resources held its archaeology field school site at Livermore Falls Recreation Area in Holderness on July 20. ELIZABETH FRANTZ / Monitor staff

  • Stephanie St. Pierre of Goffstown gathers up a sample of dirt to sift through at a New Hampshire Division of Historical Resources' archaeology field school site at Livermore Falls Recreation Area in Holderness on July 20, 2018. (ELIZABETH FRANTZ / Monitor staff) ELIZABETH FRANTZ—Monitor staff

  • Mike Corey of Chester uses a sifting screen to separate artifacts from dirt at a New Hampshire Division of Historical Resources' archaeology field school site at Livermore Falls Recreation Area in Holderness on July 20, 2018. (ELIZABETH FRANTZ / Monitor staff) ELIZABETH FRANTZ—Monitor staff

  • Scenes from the New Hampshire Division of Historical Resources' archaeology field school site at Livermore Falls Recreation Area in Holderness on July 20, 2018. (ELIZABETH FRANTZ / Monitor staff) ELIZABETH FRANTZ—Monitor staff

  • Archaeology school students work a field site at Livermore Falls during the state’s summer workshop. ELIZABETH FRANTZ / Monitor staff



Monitor staff
Monday, August 27, 2018

If you’ve ever wanted to be an archaeologist, the New Hampshire Division of Historical Resources can give you that chance. For more than 30 years, summer archaeology field school programs have been offered to students and volunteers alike, no previous experience needed.

This year the State Conservation and Rescue Archaeology Program (or SCRAP) spent time in “the Hollow” at Livermore Falls to excavate an area next to the Pemigewasset River that has a long history of occupation.

“We’ve got all these layers of stuff. Native American stuff mixed in with historic material which is very unusual,” said David Trubey, an archaeologist with the N.H. Division of Historical Resources. The group also stumbled upon modern day “artifacts” left by beachgoers as they combed through the dig site looking for materials that could tell them about the 19th-century mill town that once stood on the grounds or the Native Americans that pre-dated European settlers.

After volunteering with the SCRAP lab for a time, Mike Corey of Chester decided to sign up for the summer field school.

“I’m recently retired, so able to take four weeks to play in the middle of the summer,” Corey said after using a sifting screen to quickly separate dirt and small stones from larger objects that are then considered individually.

His partner for the day, Brian Howe, 18, of Vershire, Vt., heard about SCRAP through the Vermont Archeological Society and signed up to get some real experience in a field he’s considering as a career.

“I plan on studying archeology and art history in college,” Howe said.

Sign up for next year’s field school is not yet available, but more information can be found online at nh.gov/nhdhr/SCRAP.htm and by contacting David Trubey at david.trubey@dncr.nh.gov or 271-2813.