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Former bakery, kitchen and industrial shop from old State Hospital is torn down to become parking lot

  • Demolition of buildings on Industrial Drive, Concord, New Hampshire. Maddie Vanderpool—Concord Monitor

  • Demolition of buildings on Industrial Drive, Concord, New Hampshire. Maddie Vanderpool—Concord Monitor

  • Demolition of buildings on Industrial Drive, Concord, New Hampshire. Maddie Vanderpool—Concord Monitor

  • Demolition of buildings on Industrial Drive, Concord, New Hampshire. Maddie Vanderpool—Concord Monitor

  • An excavator move rubble to a truck at the demolition of buildings on Industrial Drive, Concord, New Hampshire. Maddie Vanderpool—Concord Monitor

  • Demolition of buildings on Industrial Drive, Concord, New Hampshire. Maddie Vanderpool—Concord Monitor

  • Three buildings on Industrial Drive are being torn down in Concord. Maddie Vanderpool—Concord Monitor

  • Three buildings on Industrial Drive are being torn down in Concord. Maddie Vanderpool—Concord Monitor

  • Three buildings on Industrial Drive are being torn down in Concord. Maddie Vanderpool—Concord Monitor

  • Three buildings on Industrial Drive are being torn down in Concord. Maddie Vanderpool / Monitor staff

  • Rubble from one of the three buildings on Industrial Drive being torn down in Concord is loaded into a truck for disposal. xxxxxxx xxxxxx / Monitor staffMaddie Vanderpool—Concord Monitor

  • The remains of one of the three buildings on Industrial Drive that torn down in Concord. Maddie Vanderpool—Concord Monitor

  • Three buildings on Industrial Drive are being torn down in Concord. Maddie Vanderpool—Concord Monitor

  • Three buildings on Industrial Drive are being torn down in Concord. Maddie Vanderpool—Concord Monitor



Monitor staff
Wednesday, June 27, 2018

In a relatively small project that has been delayed for years by unexpected structural problems and a surprise steam pipe, three small buildings attached to the former New Hampshire State Hospital in the Governor Hugh J. Gallen State Office Park have been torn down to make way for a parking lot.

The connected buildings, totaling 10,000 square feet, once held a bakery, kitchen connector and an industrial shop. They will be replaced for the time being with a parking lot for about 50 cars, said Michael Connor, deputy commissioner of the Department of Administrative Services.

That lot will replace part of an existing parking lot on the north side of the main building, which will be closed next year when a stair tower and elevator are added as part of continuing rehabilitation of the building.

The three structures, connected to the main hospital building, have been used only for storage in recent years.

A decade ago, the plan was to rehabilitate the three structures, which are tucked between the main former hospital building and the now-closed Concord Steam plant, but as time went on the buildings were found to be “structurally unsafe,” Connor said.

An original appropriation of $210,000 in 2009 was expanded by $500,000 for rehabilitation work, but then more problems with the roof were found.

“As they continued to look at it, the price was going over $1 million. So in 2013, the legislature amended legislation to create the parking lot,” Connor said.

Then another problem arose.

“That started several years ago, but we had to stop because we found a major steam pipe from Concord Steam providing steam to most of the buildings,” said Connor.

Concord Steam closed last year due to financial problems, and the state facilities were hooked up to natural gas, so that steam pipe can be removed.

Although the Gallen office park is in a busy part of Concord, the demolition will not be greatly noticed because it is between the former hospital and the Concord Steam plant on a stretch of road that has been closed off since Concord Steam shut down.

The state hospital campus was closed as a medical facility in 1989 when the New Hampshire Hospital opened, and became the Gallen Office Park, named after a former governor and hosting a variety of state agencies.

(David Brooks can be reached at 369-3313 or dbrooks@cmonitor.com.)