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PHOTOS: Crowded women's prison

  • Diane E. Ballard, right, nurse practitioner and Monica Johnson, a nursing student at Saint Anselm College, work in the only examine room at the New Hampshire State Prison for Women in Goffstown, New Hampshire. Due to lack of space already filled with desks, Johnson uses the examining table as a temporary desk.<br/><br/>(JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff)

    Diane E. Ballard, right, nurse practitioner and Monica Johnson, a nursing student at Saint Anselm College, work in the only examine room at the New Hampshire State Prison for Women in Goffstown, New Hampshire. Due to lack of space already filled with desks, Johnson uses the examining table as a temporary desk.

    (JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff)

  • The number of inmates fluctuates, but the New Hampshire State Prison for Women in Goffstown consistently deals with overcrowding. According to a report by the New Hampshire State Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, the current women's prison was converted from the former Hillsborough County house of corrections and intended as a temporary facility over 20 years ago. The report also cited a 2000 report from the National Policy White Paper of the American Society of Criminology, which noted that the number of incarcerated women in the United States has increased by 576 percent between 1980 and 1999.<br/><br/>(JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff)

    The number of inmates fluctuates, but the New Hampshire State Prison for Women in Goffstown consistently deals with overcrowding. According to a report by the New Hampshire State Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, the current women's prison was converted from the former Hillsborough County house of corrections and intended as a temporary facility over 20 years ago. The report also cited a 2000 report from the National Policy White Paper of the American Society of Criminology, which noted that the number of incarcerated women in the United States has increased by 576 percent between 1980 and 1999.

    (JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff)

  • Lisa Hicks and Sarah Spencer, inmates at the New Hampshire State Prison for Women in Goffstown, watch television in one of the bunk rooms at the prison. The number of inmates fluxuates, but it consistently faces issues of overcrowding. According to a report by the New Hampshire State Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, the current women's prison was converted from the former Hillsborough County house of corrections and intended as a temporary facility over 20 years ago. The report also cited a 2000 report from the National Policy White Paper of the American Society of Criminology, which noted that the number of incarcerated women in the United States has increased by 576 percent between 1980 and 1999.<br/><br/>(JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff)

    Lisa Hicks and Sarah Spencer, inmates at the New Hampshire State Prison for Women in Goffstown, watch television in one of the bunk rooms at the prison. The number of inmates fluxuates, but it consistently faces issues of overcrowding. According to a report by the New Hampshire State Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, the current women's prison was converted from the former Hillsborough County house of corrections and intended as a temporary facility over 20 years ago. The report also cited a 2000 report from the National Policy White Paper of the American Society of Criminology, which noted that the number of incarcerated women in the United States has increased by 576 percent between 1980 and 1999.

    (JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff)

  • Diane E. Ballard, right, nurse practitioner and Monica Johnson, a nursing student at Saint Anselm College, work in the only examine room at the New Hampshire State Prison for Women in Goffstown, New Hampshire. Due to lack of space already filled with desks, Johnson uses the examining table as a temporary desk.<br/><br/>(JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff)
  • The number of inmates fluctuates, but the New Hampshire State Prison for Women in Goffstown consistently deals with overcrowding. According to a report by the New Hampshire State Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, the current women's prison was converted from the former Hillsborough County house of corrections and intended as a temporary facility over 20 years ago. The report also cited a 2000 report from the National Policy White Paper of the American Society of Criminology, which noted that the number of incarcerated women in the United States has increased by 576 percent between 1980 and 1999.<br/><br/>(JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff)
  • Lisa Hicks and Sarah Spencer, inmates at the New Hampshire State Prison for Women in Goffstown, watch television in one of the bunk rooms at the prison. The number of inmates fluxuates, but it consistently faces issues of overcrowding. According to a report by the New Hampshire State Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, the current women's prison was converted from the former Hillsborough County house of corrections and intended as a temporary facility over 20 years ago. The report also cited a 2000 report from the National Policy White Paper of the American Society of Criminology, which noted that the number of incarcerated women in the United States has increased by 576 percent between 1980 and 1999.<br/><br/>(JOHN TULLY / Monitor staff)

Following a push that has lasted for much of the last decade, the Department of Corrections may finally receive funding from the state to build a new women’s prison. The New Hampshire House is scheduled to vote today on a $227 million capital budget, which includes $38 million to build a new women’s prison. The current facility in Goffstown was converted from the former Hillsborough County house of corrections and intended as a temporary facility more than 20 years ago. If the budget passes in the House and later in the Senate, the new prison could be built behind the men’s prison in Concord.

A 2011 report based on a two-year investigation by the New Hampshire State Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights highlights inequalities between men and women incarcerated in the state’s prison system. While noting the recidivism rate in New Hampshire is higher among women than men, the report also found a lack of vocational training opportunities, quality of visitations with family and overcrowding in the women’s prison.

Last year, four female inmates filed a lawsuit based on the inequalities in the prison. The lawsuit was put on hold pending the legislature’s decision on the prison.

If passed by the House, the proposed budget would move to the Senate for approval sometime in June.

we spend more money on prisoners than we do law abiding citizens.

Hey, we're a desk short. Lets build a new prison.

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