Learn about traditional farming

Published: 10/20/2021 9:49:25 PM

Colin Cabot, founder of Sanborn Mills Farm in Loudon, will give a talk about the restoration and development of the farm as a nonprofit craft school on Oct. 23 at 11 a.m. at the Chesley Memorial Library in Northwood. Families that attend will receive tickets to Sanborn Mills Farm.

The Chesley Memorial Library is able to offer the Sanborn Mills Farm presentation through a recurring grant from the Robert C. Grano Charitable Fund to commemorate the generosity of Joseph Grano in donating the funds to build the Theodora Kalem Grano Memorial Wing in 1991.

Sanborn Mills Farm’s mission is to teach traditional crafts and farming methods while sustainably using its field and forest resources for its workshops and events. The farm is centered around a saw mill and a grist mill – both water-powered – which have been restored over the last 20 years and are now in regular use. Draft animals, both horses and oxen, are used to plant, cultivate, and harvest field crops and also for logging in the forest.

Colin Cabot grew up in New York City, and was educated at St. Bernard’s School, Groton School, Harvard College, and the Harvard Business School.

For over 20 years Colin worked in the arts, mostly in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where he was Managing Director of the Skylight Opera Theatre, but also in New York, Chicago and at the Festival dei Due Mondi in Spoleto, Italy. In addition to performing, directing, and producing in the theatre, he also has served as co-chair of several capital campaigns and on several non-profit boards of directors.

In 1997 Colin moved with his wife Paula to Sanborn Mills Farm in Loudon. Sanborn Mills Farm’s mission is to teach traditional crafts and farming methods while sustainably using its field and forest resources for its workshops and events. The farm features two water-powered mills (a grist mill and a saw mill), and a traditional blacksmith shop dating to the 1830s; as well as numerous barns and agricultural buildings used as teaching studios for craft workshops, and housing for livestock and vintage farming equipment drawn by horses and oxen; and gardens including ornamental flower gardens, a stream garden, a teaching garden, a willow garden, a dyer’s garden, vegetable gardens, a wildflower meadow, and cropland using to grow hay and grains including wheat, oats, barley, buckwheat, rye, corn, and flax.

Colin has served on the board of directors of the Garden Conservancy. He also serves on the board of directors of the New Hampshire Land and Community Heritage Investment Program.


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