Bow girls’ lacrosse coach Chris Raabe achieves milestone win

Bow girls’ lacrosse players celebrate with Chris Raabe on her 300th career win after the team defeated Bishop Brady, 19-2, on Wednesday.

Bow girls’ lacrosse players celebrate with Chris Raabe on her 300th career win after the team defeated Bishop Brady, 19-2, on Wednesday. Chip Griffin photographs / Photos By Chip

Chris Raabe celebrates her 300th career win as the head coach of Bow girls' lacrosse.

Chris Raabe celebrates her 300th career win as the head coach of Bow girls' lacrosse. Chip Griffin—Photos By Chip

Chris Raabe coaches the Falcons during their matchup with Bishop Brady on Wednesday, when she won her 300th game.

Chris Raabe coaches the Falcons during their matchup with Bishop Brady on Wednesday, when she won her 300th game.

By ERIC RYNSTON-LOBEL

Monitor staff

Published: 04-11-2024 3:32 PM

Modified: 04-12-2024 11:16 PM


Chris Raabe’s not a big fan of all the attention. Being a high school coach is about the athletes and their accomplishments, not her own. But on Wednesday between the rain drops at Bow High School, Raabe won her 300th game as the girls’ lacrosse head coach after a 19-2 win over Bishop Brady. Her players weren’t going to let it slide under the radar.

With balloons, a poster and big smiles, Raabe’s milestone received its appropriate recognition.

“It was great,” Raabe said. “I knew it was coming up, and then I kind of forgot about it with the game and whatnot, but yeah it was quite nice. The team did a nice job.”

She began as the program’s head coach in 1998. Since then (minus the couple seasons she took off while her own daughter played lacrosse in college at Quinnipiac), she’s compiled a record of 300-79, taken Bow to 10 state championships and won five, including last year’s team that finished 18-1 and beat St. Thomas for the title.

So far this season, the Falcons are off to a 2-0 start.

“She’s been everything for that program,” Bow athletic director Mike Desilets said. “It's easy to coach talent — and we’ve certainly had some — but I think she makes a big difference with those that don’t come in with a ton of talent or with a ton of lacrosse experience, and she makes them into big parts of the team.”

Raabe works in the high school as a health and physical education teacher, so she knows the kids far better than a coach who didn’t work at the school would. That’s helped her identify student-athletes who might never have played lacrosse before but possessed a skillset that she thought would transfer well.

Her presence in the school has also helped develop the all-important trait every program wants: a good culture.

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“She has great relationships with the kids,” Desilets said. “We have alumni that played for her in years’ past that come back and are always yelling her name. … And it’s a program that runs on its own. I don’t have to do a whole lot with the girls’ lacrosse program because she’s just going to take care of it with the experiences that she has and the culture that she’s built within it.”

True to form, though, Raabe deflected the credit to her players.

“It’s been great fun,” she said. “I have had the luxury of having very competitive athletes over the course of my coaching here, which helps because they bring the competitiveness upon each other. It makes my job coaching quite easy.”