Difficult driving, closed schools, canceled flights: What to expect from Northeast snowstorm

Heavy, wet snow bends the branches of the trees off of Route 106 in Concord on Tuesday, January 30, 2024. The recent rain of Sunday and then the snow that night caused the branches to weighted down.

Heavy, wet snow bends the branches of the trees off of Route 106 in Concord on Tuesday, January 30, 2024. The recent rain of Sunday and then the snow that night caused the branches to weighted down. GEOFF FORESTER

By DAVE COLLINS

Associated Press

Published: 02-12-2024 3:03 PM

HARTFORD, Conn. — Parts of the Northeast were preparing Monday for a coastal storm that was expected to pack high winds and dump a foot or more of snow in some areas, leading to school closures, warnings against traveling by road and the possible disruption of flights.

The nation’s largest school system in New York City said it was switching classes to remote learning and closing its buildings Tuesday because of the impending storm.

“With several inches of snow, poor visibility on the roads, and possible coastal flooding heading our way, New Yorkers should prepare in advance of tomorrow’s storm and take the necessary precautions to remain safe,” New York City Mayor Eric Adams said in a statement. “If you do not have to be on the roads tomorrow, please stay home.”

Some of the highest snowfall totals were forecast for the northern suburbs of New York City and southwestern Connecticut, where 12 to 15 inches (30 to 38 centimeters) were possible, according to the National Weather Service. Wind gusts could hit 60 mph (97 kph) off the Massachusetts coast and 40 mph (64 kph) in interior parts of southern New England.

Forecasters said the storm track has been difficult to predict, with models on Monday showing it moving more to the south, which could decrease snowfall forecasts.

“It will make for a messy commute tomorrow morning,” Christina Speciale, a meteorologist for the weather service in Albany, New York, said Monday. “This is a fast-moving storm, so things should be cleared out by tomorrow afternoon.”

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In Massachusetts, Gov. Maura Healey told all non-essential Executive Branch employees to not report to work Tuesday. Boston schools will be closed and a parking ban will be in effect. Similar closures and bans were put in place in cities and towns across the region.

Boston Mayor Michelle Wu said the city’s homeless shelters will remain open.

“With the arrival of our first major snowstorm this winter, city teams are prepared to clear our roadways and respond to any emergencies during the storm,” Wu said.

Transportation officials in Pennsylvania urged people to avoid unnecessary travel and said vehicle restrictions would go into effect early Tuesday on the Pennsylvania Turnpike and other major roads.

Airports in the region asked travelers to check with their airlines in case of cancelations and delays.

Power companies said they were preparing to respond to possible outages that could occur because of trees and branches falling onto electricity lines.

“The hazardous conditions can also make travel challenging for our crews, so we’re staging extra staff and equipment across the state to ensure we’re ready to respond as quickly as possible wherever our crews are needed,” said Steve Sullivan, Eversource’s president of Connecticut electric operations.