Snowstorm dumps more than two feet across N.H.

  • Bob Parent digs out the family driveway on Union Street so his son, Cote could get to work on Thursday morning, December 17, 2020. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • Bob Parent and his son, Cote, did out their driveway on Union Street so Cote could get to work on Thursday morning. GEOFF FORESTER photos / Monitor staff

  • TOP: The snow was still coming down hard on Centre Street on Thursday morning as people were digging out.

  • Bob Parent and his son, Cote, and wife, Cynthia dig out their driveway on Union Street so Cote could get to work on Thursday morning, December 17, 2020. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • Bob Parent and his son, Cote, and wife, Cynthia dig out their driveway on Union Street so Cote could get to work on Thursday morning, December 17, 2020. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • Oscar Redmond, 5, gets a hand getting out of the snow from his mother, Audrey, in front of their home on Maple Street on Thursday, December 17, 2020. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • Oscar Redmond, 5, gets a hand getting out of the snow from his mother, Audrey, in front of their home on Thursday.

  • Oscar Redmond, 5, plays in the snow in front of his family’s home on Maple Street in Concord on Thursday, December 17, 2020. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • A Christmas decoration on the porch of house on Union Street is pelted with snow on Thursday, December 17, 2020. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • Cars buried on Union Street in downtown Concord on Thursday. GEOFF FORESTER photos / Monitor staff

  • A Concord city plow truck clears Union Street in downtown Concord on Thursday, December 17, 2020. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • Kathleen Buckman helps a friend dig out her car on Washington Street on Thursday.

Staff and wire reports
Published: 12/17/2020 11:22:03 AM

The Sunapee-Kearsarge region received almost three feet of snow Thursday and Concord got two feet as the Northeast was blanketed by a surprisingly strong storm that broke records further south.

Although the snow was deep it was so light that while it made driving difficult in the morning due to reduced visibility, it didn’t bring down many power lines.

“We've got a LOT more snow than predicted in many spots, but it's light & fluffy so widespread power outages are not occurring. Crews are standing by but biggest threat for outages is car accidents!” New Hampshire Electric Co-op wrote on its Twitter feed.

In New Hampshire, there were at least 50 crashes and disabled vehicles due to poor road conditions as of noon Thursday but no major power outages reported..

Observations reported by the National Weather Service included 33 inches in New London by a “trained spotter” and reports of up to 40 inches from other towns around Lake Sunapee and Mt. Kearsarge.

The Automated Surface Reporting System at Concord Municipal Airport registered 24 inches at 3 p.m. as the storm was winding down.

Concord extended its on-street parking ban through 7 a.m. Friday and many public buildings shut their doors Thursday.

Snow depth varied widely in the state, with less than a foot reported north of the White Mountains. The the heaviest snow fell in a relatively narrow band across central New Hampshire.

On the Seacoast the storm came at a time of very high tides, causing some street flooding in Hampton and other communities.

The band of heavy snow hit some Northeast regions partciularly hard. Williamsport, Pennsylvania, for example, reported 24.7 inches of snow, the most from any single storm on record. Observers around Binghamtom, N.Y., reported getting 40 inches or more.

Officials said they didn't expect the winter blast to disrupt vaccine distribution. COVID-19 vaccines started being   given to frontline he   alth care workers earlier this week.




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