×

Archie Richards: Liberalism and the Democratic Party are dying

  • On Aug. 15, 2014, protesters march down the middle of a street in Ferguson, Mo., almost a week after the shooting death of Michael Brown by police. Charlie Riedel



For the Monitor
Friday, October 12, 2018

In a recent Wall Street Journal column, Shelby Steele, senior fellow at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution, said that the hatred displayed by the American left signifies that liberalism and the Democratic Party are dying.

In the 1960s, America accepted that slavery and segregation were, as Steele put it, “profound moral failings.” The left took charge of America’s moral legitimacy and gained significant political power. This led to the greatest array of government social programs the world has ever seen.

A white-on-black shooting four years ago in Ferguson, Mo., resulted in a lengthy media blitz. But thousands of black-on-black shootings in Chicago during those same four years gained little notice. Why? The left gained power by fighting white evil, not black despair.

From the 1960s on, Steele avers, “America achieved one of the greatest moral evolutions ever.” Racism greatly diminished. “Bigotry exists,” he wrote in a previous article, “but it is far down on the list of problems minorities now face. I grew up black in segregated America, where it was hard to find an open door. It’s harder now for young blacks to find a closed one.”

The diminishment of racism threatens the left’s power. Unlike the demonstrations of the 1960s, when people donned their Sunday best for marching, today’s liberal demonstrations are marked by intolerance, anger and anti-Americanism. Some liberal demonstrations are marked by incoherence, bizarre sexuality, violence and vulgarity. Liberals seem to be grasping at straws.

Some black people remain poor, of course. But they’re not poor because they’re black. They’re poor because the innumerable government social programs brought by liberals have widened the gap between rich and poor. For black and white poor, laws and regulations have made life harder and more costly.

The multitude of government social programs that have kept the poor down should be reversed. This will narrow the wealth gap and enable the poor of all colors to thrive.

(Archie Richards lives in Concord.)