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Aviation museum to feature 1968 film footage of N.H.’s deadliest plane crash

  • A screenshot from a video of the October 25, 1968, rescue and removal operation on Moose Mountain in Hanover after the crash of Northeast Airlines Flight 946. The original 24 minutes of footage was provided to former Valley News sports editor Donald Mahler when he wrote a series of stories marking the 40th anniversary of the disaster.

  • A group of hikers gathered Oct. 13 for a toast on Moose Mountain in Hanover to commemorate the October 1968 crash of Northeast Airlines Flight 946. Valley News

  • The crash scene shortly after the accident on Oct. 25, 1968, on Moose Mountain in Etna. Courtesy of Aviation Museum of New Hampshire


Associated Press
Friday, November 09, 2018

The Aviation Museum of New Hampshire is featuring recently discovered film footage taken 50 years ago by recovery workers at a plane crash site on Moose Mountain, the state’s deadliest air crash.

The museum, based at the Manchester-Boston Regional Airport in Londonderry, is giving a presentation Saturday in remembrance of the Oct. 25, 1968, crash. Thirty-two people died and 10 survived the Northeast Airlines crash, which happened on the passenger plane’s approach to Lebanon Municipal Airport.

Speakers will include Jeff Rapsis, the museum’s executive director and son of Capt. John A. Rapsis, the pilot of Northeast Flight 946 who was among those lost in the crash. Other speakers include Charlie Garipay of Hanover, who was among those who responded to the crash and aided in recovery efforts; and Barbara Clavette of Bowdoinham, Maine, whose father, Earle Jewell, was among the survivors. Jewell died in 1976.

The footage was provided to a former Valley News sports editor Donald Mahler when he wrote a series of stories marking the 40th anniversary of the disaster. The museum also will show pieces of the aircraft’s fuselage.

Ahead of the 50th anniversary, a group of about 40 people hiked to the crash site earlier this month. That story prompted Valley News readers to share their memories of the tragedy.

“We hope that the opportunity to pause and remember this accident will honor the memory of all those lost in the crash, and all those whose lives were changed by it,” Rapsis said.

A group of about 40 people hiked to the crash site last month.