OUR ENVIRONMENT NEEDS MORE LOCAL REPORTING

The Concord Monitor is launching its Environmental Reporting Lab, a long-term effort to better inform the community about the New Hampshire environment. To launch phase 1 of this effort, we need your help. The money raised will go toward hiring a full-time environmental reporter.

Please consider donating to this effort.

 

‘It’s a colt!’ Jaffrey farm celebrates birth of rare Newfoundland pony

  • A Newfoundland pony colt was born at the Newfoundland Pony Conservancy Center in Jaffrey on Monday morning. Cabot’s Stormin’ Sam is pictured above with his mother Highland Snow Storm. Ben Conant photos / Monadnock Ledger-Transcript staff

  • Cabot’s Stormin’ Sam was born at the Newfoundland Pony Conservancy Center in Jaffrey on Monday morning. Staff photo by Ben Conant

  • George and Emily Aho make a sign to announce birth of pony born at the Newfoundland Pony Conservancy Center in Jaffrey on Monday morning.

  • A Newfoundland pony colt was born at the Newfoundland Pony Conservancy Center in Jaffrey on Monday morning. Staff photo by Ben Conant—

  • A Newfoundland pony colt was born at the Newfoundland Pony Conservancy Center in Jaffrey on Monday morning. Staff photo by Ben Conant—

  • A Newfoundland pony colt was born at the Newfoundland Pony Conservancy Center in Jaffrey on Monday morning. Staff photo by Ben Conant—

Monadnock Ledger-Transcript
Published: 7/25/2019 4:55:00 PM

Emily and George Aho “met over a horse” ten years ago, got married last year, and now, they’re planning a baby shower – for a rare Newfoundland pony born at their Jaffrey farm. Cabot’s Stormin’ Sam was born on Monday morning at the Newfoundland Pony Conservancy Center in Jaffrey. He is one of just two rare Newfoundland ponies expected to be born in the U.S. this year.

Newfoundland ponies are a critically endangered “landrace” breed of pony, which means their traits are naturally, rather than artificially, selected. There are less than 500 of their breed worldwide.

Emily Aho, executive director of the Newfoundland Pony Conservancy Center, sees this birth as a victory for every breed of pony. Because the Newfoundland pony, as a landrace breed, was naturally selected and adapted, the breed “has no genetic disorders whatsoever.” Aho stressed this as an anomaly compared to other pony breeds.

“A breed like this is important because (Newfoundland) genetics can be injected into less healthy breeds’ gene pools to save them,” she said.

Aho said that Sam the foal will not be gelded, and will eventually go to a conservation breeding home, where he’ll begin to be bred at age three or four.

“He’ll stay here for at least a year,” Aho said. “Typically people take foals away from their mothers at six months, but we like to keep them with the herd as long as possible.”

Sam’s lineage is especially significant as both the mare and stallion that sired him have had very few foals. This rarity of lineage is important from a genetic diversity standpoint, but Aho said that, with so few ponies overall, every successful siring is important.

Sam is named for Samantha Newton, who has volunteered at the Center for the past three years.

“She’s very dedicated, I love the volunteers who come here when it’s ten below zero,” Aho said, adding that Highland Snow Storm, or “Stormy,” Sam’s mother, has a special affinity for Newton.

“They’re born friendly, he’s really cute,” she said of the foal. “He’ll be running around in a couple days. ... Tomorrow I’ll put a halter on him for the first time, that will be fun – not!”

Aho said she will schedule a series of Open Barn Days after the mare and colt get settled for additional opportunities to visit the new colt. Check the Newfoundland Pony Conservancy Center website and Facebook page for further information.




Concord Monitor Office

1 Monitor Drive
Concord,NH 03301
603-224-5301

 

© 2021 Concord Monitor
Terms & Conditions - Privacy Policy