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New husband-and-wife run storefront opens on Perley Street 

  • A handmade soap at Bog Road Designs on Perley Street in the former Teddy’s Tees storefront on Wedensday, November 17. 2021. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • Kelly Jewett at her store Bog Road Designs on Perley Street in the former Teddy’s Tees storefront on Wedensday, November 17. 2021. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • Kelly Jewett and her husband at their store Bog Road Designs on Perley Street in the former Teddy’s Tees storefront on Wedensday, November 17. 2021. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • Above the facade of a Christmas mantelpiece on the back wall hangs a poster of the couple’s four boys, who are ages 3, 6, 8 and 10 years old. GEOFF FORESTER / Monitor staff

  • Kelly Jewett at her store Bog Road Designs on Perley Street in the former Teddy’€™s Tees storefront on Wednesday. GEOFF FORESTER / Monitor staff

Monitor staff
Published: 11/22/2021 6:13:13 PM

A new store run by a married couple opened last week at the old location of Teddy's Tees, another Concord business that started as a husband and wife operation on Perley Street. 

Bog Road Designs, owned by Kelly and Bradley Jewett, is the latest in a string of businesses to open downtown in the last few months, as shoppers return and store owners enact dreams nursed during pandemic lockdowns.

Their core products are small wooden signs for sale with sweet or kooky sayings, arranged by theme: “bathroom,” “work-out,” “coffee,” and holidays. The signs reminding people to wash their hands became especially popular in 2020, especially a top seller reading “wash your hands, you filthy animal,” a nod to Home Alone. 

In addition to the signs, which can be ordered with custom wording, Bog Road Designs sells wooden lanterns and blanket ladders, soap, candles and vases with various false flowers. Signs above the flowers indicate what each color symbolizes, like yellow, which means friendship, innocence and welcome.

Kelly Jewett started selling the small, handmade signs she crafted on Etsy in 2018, as she raised four boys. “We just knew that between daycare and finances, that when Jax, the fourth, was born, that I really wasn’t going to have a job inside of the home,” she said. The business soon took off, as she sold online and to family and friends.

In addition to the retail store, the Perley Street location has a workshop in the back for her husband Bradley to fashion the wood, and a middle section with desks where mothers Kelly met through the parent association at Beaver Meadow School work preparing printed stencils.

“It’s a perfect gig for moms because it’s just busy work, it’s not too difficult,” Jewett said.

The couple tries to source locally, selling Granite State Candy Shoppe chocolate and getting their lumber from Chichester. “Everybody loves local, so we try to keep that,” she said.

Last week, Jewett handed out 200 flyers to advertise the store’s grand opening on Nov. 13. The store’s name is a reference to the family’s home.

A small autumn section in the store adorned with fake gourds is overpowered by the sight and scent of Christmas, including festive greenery, wood signs that with sayings like “meet me under the mistletoe” and a tree. Above the facade of a Christmas mantelpiece on the back wall hangs a photo of the couple’s four boys, who are 10,8,6, and 3 years old.

The couple said the boys enjoy using the handheld scanner to scan merchandise. On Wednesday, one had left an errant fidget spinner on the store’s floor.

“They can do the little things, they like to scan and wrap,” Jewett said. “They can help and they can paint and they can cause a scene. They like to help because they like to be a part of it.”

The Jewetts saw that the Perley Street location was on the market in the summer, after they had had a booming year of online sales while customers were stuck at home.

“Everybody was shopping online because nobody wanted to go out anywhere,” Kelly Jewett said. “We took the leap of faith and bought this and tried to bring it to life.”

They were excited by the building’s space, its proximity to Main Street and the parking lot – a rare find for downtown locations.

The Jewetts see themselves as continuing the legacy of husband-and-wife team Ted and Eileen Story, who started Teddy’s Tees in their home in 1982. Kelly said that at the property closing, they teared up when Eileen told them the Bog Road Designs had reminded her of how her own business started.

Eileen Story no longer owns Teddy Tee’s, now located on Sheep Davis Road, but she owned the building until the Jewetts purchased it this year.

“I just saw the parallel between us,” Story said. “I liked the idea that it’s a family business, I think it fit the neighborhood nicely.”

Kelly and Bradley were both raised in Concord, but when they met, Bradley was living in Virginia. He was on a short visit Concord for a funeral when he ate at Friendly’s on Loudon Road. Kelly was his waitress. Later they learned his dad had gone to high school with her mom, and that his aunt was a health aide to her disabled sister.

“I thought I had met this random guy from Virginia but that wasn’t the case. The roots were way deeper than we had ever known,” Kelly said. “We were getting to know each other when the whole family had known each other for decades. It’s kind of the small-town Concord story, isn’t it?”

She followed him to Virginia for school, and then they returned to Concord together.

“We’re stuck now with kids, we’re in too deep,” she said with a laugh. “We’re not going anywhere.”


Cassidy Jensen bio photo

Cassidy Jensen has been a reporter at the Monitor, covering the city of Concord and criminal justice, since July 2021. Previously, she was a fellow at the Toni Stabile Center for Investigative Journalism at Columbia University, where she earned a master's degree. Her work has been published in Documented, THE CITY, Washington City Paper and Street Sense Media. When she's not at City Council meetings, you can find her hiking in the White Mountains.



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