Police identify Clegg in courtroom during week two of trial

Concord Detective Garrett Lemoine said that Logan Clegg in the courtroom on Tuesday was the same man who  gave the alias ˜Arthur Kelly™ back in April of 2022. Lemoine testified that Clegg™’s behavior was consistent with other homeless folk in the Concord community who didn’™t want to identify themselves or speak to the police. Lemoine testified on the fifth day of the trial of Clegg at Merrimack County Superior Court.

Concord Detective Garrett Lemoine said that Logan Clegg in the courtroom on Tuesday was the same man who gave the alias ˜Arthur Kelly™ back in April of 2022. Lemoine testified that Clegg™’s behavior was consistent with other homeless folk in the Concord community who didn’™t want to identify themselves or speak to the police. Lemoine testified on the fifth day of the trial of Clegg at Merrimack County Superior Court. GEOFF FORESTER / Monitor staff

By JAMIE L. COSTA

Monitor staff

Published: 10-11-2023 9:16 AM

Concord Detective Garrett Lemoine pointed across the courtroom at Logan Clegg in his blue button-down shirt and identified him as the same man he spoke to last spring when searching for a missing couple near the Alton Woods apartment complex. 

In a wooded area east of the apartment complex, Concord detectives first encountered Clegg, who gave the alias “Arthur Kelly.” At the time, they had no idea he’d become the lead suspect in the fatal shooting of retirees Steve and Wendy Reid.

“We told him that we were investigating a report of two missing people in the area and proceeded to ask him if he saw anyone else around the trails or heard anything,” Lemoine testified Tuesday in Merrimack County Superior Court. “He said that he left his tent in the morning and returned in the afternoon but had not seen anybody.”

When Lemoine continued to question him, he said Clegg became uncooperative, refused anything further and told Lemoine he didn’t like police. However, Lemoine testified that Clegg’s behavior was consistent with other homeless individuals in the Concord community who didn’t want to identify themselves or speak to police. 

The following day, the bodies of Wendy and Steve Reid were found shot to death along the Broken Ground trail system, less than half a mile from their home. When a witness came forward and described seeing a man matching the description of “Arthur Kelly” on the same day she heard gunshots in the woods, Lemoine returned to the campsite to question Clegg, but he was gone. 

“The tent was gone, the trash was gone and I could not locate anything left behind in the area where I had contact with him,” Lemoine said. “This is extremely uncommon; usually there is at least something left behind. Very rarely do the transient community pick up anything.”

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Noting the presence of dozens of Mountain Dew cans at the site the previous day, Lemoine began combing through surveillance footage from nearby grocery stores, like Walmart and Shaw’s, to find the man he’d seen in the woods. Between April and August 2022, he viewed dozens of recordings of Clegg purchasing various products from both stores, including frequent purchases of Mountain Dew. Leaving the stores, he watched Clegg exit the parking lot on foot toward the area of Alton Woods where he was first questioned. 

In August 2022, Concord detectives collected evidence from a second tent site north of the Marsh Loop Trail where the victims were found, which included spent 9mm shell casings consistent with the bullets, fragments and casings recovered from the crime scene. They also found barcodes for clothing purchased at Walmart that were consistent with purchases made by Clegg.

It was then that police tied the tent site to Clegg. Three days before the murders, Office Brian Cregg responded to the same tent site for a report of a homeless encampment next to the power lines off the Profile Avenue Connector Trail, part of the Broken Ground trail system, he said Tuesday. 

“We don’t usually take tent calls in that particular area. Nothing was burned at the site on that day and the only thing I saw was that the tent was padlocked and there was a pair of brown boots outside the tent,” Cregg said. “I showed [Detective Wade] Brown in July where I responded that day on the original call for service. The site was burnt and I saw dozens of propane tanks that I didn’t see prior in the tent area where it looked like it had been burnt.”

Police estimated the tent was burned somewhere between April 15 and April 20, 2022, according to testimony. Police determined the Reids were killed on April 18 and Clegg left town on April 20, the day before their bodies were found. 

He was tracked down six months later, days before he was scheduled to leave the country.

“We later learned from Homeland Security that the defendant had booked an international flight to Berlin from JFK and he was going to leave on October 14 ,” Lemoine testified. “We unearthed a Verizon phone and requested an exigent ping and were told they were coming from Vermont.”

Around 6 p.m. on October 11, Concord detectives traveled to Burlington and arrived at Centennial Woods where they believed Clegg was located. Believing that he would be traveling to New York to catch his flight in the coming days, they marked the exits and entrances of the wooded area and monitored the bus station nearby that they believed Clegg would use to travel to the city. 

Early the next morning, police received a location update that showed Clegg left the woods and was closer to town. The detectives split up and Lemoine first went to the international airport nearby in search of Clegg before searching a shopping plaza where he saw Clegg inside the grocery store talking to employees.

Several minutes later, Clegg left and traveled by foot to the public library where six armed officers arrested him and charged him as a fugitive out of Utah. He was later extradited to Concord where he was charged with four charges of second-degree murder, four charges of falsifying physical evidence and one count of being a felon in possession of a firearm. 

If Clegg, 27, is found guilty, he faces life in prison. He has remained held without bail in the Merrimack County House of Corrections in Boscawen since his arrest a year ago. 

Clegg’s defense attorneys have continued to argue that his elusive behavior before and after the fatal shootings was a result of his previous felony convictions and paranoia to keep his identity hidden from police, not an indication of his guilt.

Concord Detective Danika Gorham will continue her testimony on Wednesday morning.