Canterbury Shaker Village executive director to step down

Monitor staff

Published: 10-22-2023 8:00 AM

After almost four years in the position, the executive director of the Canterbury Shaker Village will be stepping down next year.

Leslie Nolan announced recently that she will be stepping away from her position in May 2024 because she’s moving away. Beginning in November she will work remotely on special projects for the Village including new program initiatives, grant writing, and preparing for an upcoming capital campaign for the non-profit museum.

“Leslie is leaving an indelible mark on the Village over her past 4 years here, and the Board is grateful for the expertise and enthusiasm she brought to the job,” said Board Chair Jean Nye. “While Leslie’s role will change over the next six months, the foundation she has laid will remain integral to our identity.”

Board of Trustee Louis Kaucic said Nolan helped forge this identity by successfully navigating the Village through “extremely challenging times, including the pandemic and complicated building restoration projects.”

Canterbury Shaker Village dates back to 1792 and was a thriving community of Shakers for 200 years. It became a non-profit museum in 1992 telling the story of the Shakers here and elsewhere after the last Shaker sister in residence, Ethel Hudson, died.

The Village owns about 700 acres that includes 26 original and 4 reconstructed buildings, gardens, working fields, mill ponds and a series of interpretive trails telling about Shaker life and other programming. The property is under permanent conservation easement.

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The Village has 8 full-time and 2 part-time employees, and operates with a team of volunteers that currently number around 60. The annual operating budget is slightly more than $1 million.

It was designated as a National Historic Landmark for its architectural integrity and significance. To learn more, visit shakers.org.