Skid steers, snowmobiles and stainless steel kitchen equipment among items for sale at surplus auction

  • Jason Wright, manager of the state-owned White Farm Facility in Concord, balances on a front loader that will be auctioned off this coming Saturday. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • Jason Wright, manager of the state-owned White Farm Facility in Concord, balances on one of the front loaders on Thursday, May 9, 2019 that will be auctioned off this coming Saturday. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • Some of the auction items at White Farm on Thursday, May 9, 2019. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • Some of the auction items at White Farm on Thursday, May 9, 2019. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • Some of the auction items at White Farm on Thursday, May 9, 2019. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • Some of the auction items at White Farm on Thursday, May 9, 2019. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

Monitor staff
Published: 5/14/2019 1:03:26 PM

Little kids who like great big trucks and other large machinery – or big kids who like them, for that matter – will want to visit White Farm in Concord this coming Saturday.

Cooks might want to show up, too.

“We have a lot of graders and loaders,” said Jason Wright, manager of the state-owned facility at 144 Clinton Street in Concord, as he prepared for the semi-annual auction of surplus equipment from state and community governments. He noted some other eye-catching items: Bobcat skid steers, farm and lawn equipment, paving and plowing rigs, a dozen fishing boats from Boston Whalers to vintage Alumacraft, four-wheel ATVs, John Deere Gators, several snowmobiles and trailers, welders, compressors, tools, pallets of fertilizer and limestone, truck parts, just to name a few.

Plus a “manual pottery wheel” for the artistic among you. 

“There’s also lots of kitchen equipment” because of remodeling at the Tilton Veterans Home as well as a decision by the Department of Safety, which “dumped their cafeteria.”

“We have a lot of stainless (steel) equipment, a lot of refrigeration units,” Wright said.

The auctions, which happen every spring and fall, have become something of an institution in the area, both for people seeking deals on very specific equipment and from families that like to wander through a sort of Disneyland of industrial and office items.

The amount of money collected varies from sale to sale, as you might expect. Receipts in recent years have ranged from $106,000 to $228,000 for municipal items and from $213,000 to as much as $628,000 for state items.

If the past is any guide, close to 1,000 people are likely to register Friday and show up for the auction on Saturday.

Items can be previewed Friday, May 17, from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. On Saturday, preview of inside items starts at 7:30 a.m., with  the inside auction beginning at 8:30 a.m. The auction for outside items, mostly vehicles, will start at 9 a.m.

Vehicles ranging from police cars or sedate sedans to specialty vehicles for construction and other trades, are the biggest draw. Two auctioneers will be working just for the vehicle sales, while another auctioneer will work inside the storage buildings, handling the wide variety of other material.

Some old trucks that were taken out of commission under “green grants,” which aim to remove more polluting vehicles from the road, will be sold as parts. They have drilled engine blocks and cut body frames, so they can’t return to the road.

The sales will be run by James R. St Jean auctioneers.

(David Brooks can be reached at 369-3313 or dbrooks@cmonitor.com or on Twitter @GraniteGeek.)


Concord Monitor Office

1 Monitor Drive
Concord,NH 03301
603-224-5301

 

© 2019 Concord Monitor
Terms & Conditions - Privacy Policy