Work on repairing the slate shingles of the Kimball Jenkins mansion begins

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  • Contractor Lucas Fowler uses a rope pulley to bring up supplies to the roof of the Kimball Jenkins Estate on Tuesday.

  • Workers walk down the stairs to the main scaffolding at the Kimball Jenkins Estate on North Main Street in Concord on Tuesday, July 21, 2020. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • The second floor landing at the Kimball Jenkins Estate on North Main Street in Concord on Tuesday, July 21, 2020. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • The scaffolding for the renovation project at the Kimball Jenkins Estate covers the upper half of the building as the work has begun on fixing the roof and gables all around the building. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • Workers climb down the scaffolding around the Kimball Jenkins Estate on Tuesday, July 21, 2020 as work has begun on the slate roof and the restoration of all the gables around the top of the estate. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • Rob Zielinski of Z Design shows where some of the transition molding has completely rotted out along the roof line where it meets the gables.

  • Rob Zielinski of Z Design on top of the roof of the Kimball Jenkins Estate on North Main Street in Concord on Tuesday, July 21, 2020. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • The stains from leaks mar the inside of the roof in the attic of the Kimball Jenkins Estate on Tuesday. GEOFF FORESTER photos / Monitor staff

  • ABOVE: Rob Zielinski of Z Design looks at the sill of a double window gable on top of the roof of the Kimball Jenkins Estate. GEOFF FORESTER photos / Monitor staff

  • Contractor Paul Donaghey walks on the roof scaffolding as he works on securing the lead paint containment sheathing before work can be done on the gables and roof of the Kimball Jenkins Estate on Tuesday, July 21, 2020. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • Some of the intricate molding that needs repair on the main front gable on the roof of the Kimball Jenkins Estate on North Main Street in Concord on Tuesday, July 21, 2020.  GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • TOP: The scaffolding for the roof and gable repair of the Kimball Jenkins Estate has gone up.

  • A hole in the valley of the slate roofline that will need to be repaired at the Kimball Jenkins Estate. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

Monitor staff
Published: 7/21/2020 4:57:43 PM

Kimball Jenkins Estate has started a project to repair and restore one of the art school’s historic buildings.

The Concord nonprofit received a $202,000 matching grant from the Land and Community Heritage Investment Program to repair the 136-year-old slate roof and gables of the Kimball Jenkins Mansion. The budget for the project is nearly $400,000, almost all of which will go to labor.

The estate consists of several historic buildings, most notably the main home known as the mansion, on more than four acres at the intersection of North Main Street and Route 202. It dates to the late 1700s and has been a center for arts education and appreciation for decades. The last heir of the line, Carolyn Jenkins, left it to the city when she died in 1981, with directions that it be used for cultural and educational purposes, including the “encouragement of art.”

“Carolyn Jenkins was the last of the Kimball family to live in this gorgeous house. She wanted it to be preserved as a historic resource, maybe partnering with the New Hampshire Historical Society,” said Althea Barton, director of outreach and development for the Kimball Jenkins organization. “She told a friend that she’d rather see it demolished than converted to private use, like a doctor’s office.

“This restoration project is a heavy lift for a nonprofit like Kimball Jenkins – $400,000 is almost our whole annual budget. But with the $202,000 grant from LCHIP and generous support from community partners, we’re determined to fulfill Carolyn’s last wishes.”

In 2018, Kimball Jenkins restored the roof of the carriage house, a project that brought in a $10,500 LCHIP grant as well as matching funding. And it led to the work currently under way.

“When LCHIP came by for the final inspection, they looked up and said, ‘Okay, you’re done with the carriage house. When are you restoring the main house?’ ” said Barton.

The Kimball Jenkins organization then called Mark Hopkins, who is well-known in preservations circles, and who himself knew Carolyn Jenkins. Hopkins and Rob Zielinski of Z Design pulled together a team that would work through all aspects of the project, from the slate roof itself to the final coating of paint.

“Plus the intricate scaffolding we need to get up to the highest peaks,” Barton added.

Kimball Jenkins Estate is best known today for its School of Art, which teaches more than 1,300 students every year, as well as an annual art camp. It also holds studios and display spaces for visual art in several buildings.

The project is expected to take four months to complete.




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