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2011 Concord High grad keeps home close through novel

  • Chrisinda Lynch, shown in Central Park West in New York City in July 2017, works in publishing. Courtesy

Monitor staff
Published: 8/31/2019 3:04:08 PM

Chrisinda Lynch always knew she would leave New Hampshire for a career in publishing. But she keeps home in her heart while living in New York City, in part thanks to a novel set in the Granite State.

The 2011 Concord High School valedictorian has been writing a novel set in a fictional New Hampshire mill town since her last semester at the Macaulay Honors College at the City University of New York. Four years later, she said she is in the early stages of sending the novel to agents.

The story follows what happens when a big-box store moves in as told through the eyes of the town’s local hairdresser. The story takes place in 1990 and deals with elements of race, class and queerness, Lynch says, and is inspired by Manchester and the Amoskeag mills, as well as Lynch’s family history in the textile mills of Massachusetts.

Lynch, 26, now works for St. Martin’s Press of Macmillan Publishers while living in Brooklyn. She said she misses New Hampshire for the forests and the trees, and her friends and family who remain there.

Leaving home, she said, wasn’t necessarily about home. “I think I probably would have felt that way no matter where I grew up,” she said. “... It’s hard to say whether I can equate my desire to get out of New Hampshire with my desire to get anywhere and figure my life out.”

Lynch said she still loves visiting home but doesn’t know if it’s “necessarily where I want to live my life,” citing the ease of not having a car and the sheer amount of cultural activities available in the Big Apple.

Plus, she said she felt a strong desire to be independent – and nothing was going to teach her that like navigating a city of 8.6 million people.

While there are publishing opportunities in New Hampshire, Lynch said she always wanted to work for a big publisher – St. Martin’s, according to its website, is the seventh largest publisher in the United States.

“I think that was why I really wanted to leave,” she said.




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