Voters at Concord Sanders event say he is still Democrat’s standout candidate 

  • Siblings Esha Camacho, 10, (left) and Taro Camacho, 8, (right) hold signs to support Bernie Sanders at the Grappone Conference Center in Concord on Sunday. The event was the Camachos fourth time seeing Sanders speak, including previous events from Sanders’s 2016 presidential campaign.  LEAH WILLINGHAM / Monitor staff

  • Shaun Sutliff of Adams, Mass. shows of the buttons on his hat he got to support Sen. Bernie Sanders’s past presidential and congressional campaigns at the Grappone Center in Concord on Sunday.  LEAH WILLINGHAM / Monitor staff

  • Charm Camacho of Concord shows off a photo from 2016 of her children Esha and Taro Camacho with Sen. Bernie Sanders at his event at the Grappone Conference Center in Concord on Sunday. The event was the family’s fourth time seeing Sanders speak.  LEAH WILLINGHAM / Monitor staff

  • Siblings Esha Camacho, 10, (left) and Taro Camacho, 8, (right) hold signs to support Bernie Sanders at the Grappone Conference Center in Concord on Sunday. The event was the Camachos fourth time seeing Sanders speak, including previous events from Sanders’s 2016 presidential campaign.  LEAH WILLINGHAM / Monitor staff

  • Siblings Esha Camacho, 10, (left) and Taro Camacho, 8, (right) of Concord wait for Sen. Bernie Sanders to make his entrance at this event at the Grappone Conference Center in Concord on Sunday.  LEAH WILLINGHAM / Monitor staff

  • Shaun Sutliff of Adams, Mass. shows of the buttons on his hat he got to support Sen. Bernie Sanders’s past presidential and congressional campaigns at the Grappone Center in Concord on Sunday.  LEAH WILLINGHAM / Monitor staff

  • FAR LEFT: Shaun Sutliff of Adams, Mass. shows off the buttons he got to support Sanders’s past campaigns.

  • LEFT: Greg Tuveson of Dover is a past Sanders campaign volunteer.

  • Edward Witham Jr. of Arlington Mass. (left) and Greg Tuveson of Dover talk about Sen. Bernie Sanders’s presidential campaign at the Grappone Conference Center in Concord on Sunday.  LEAH WILLINGHAM / Monitor staff

  • Brittany Snow (left) and Cassandra Snow of Concord cheer as they listen to Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders speak in Concord on Sunday. LEAH WILLINGHAM / Monitor photos

  • 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders greets supporters during a campaign stop Sunday in Concord. AP

  • 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders greets people in the audience after addressing a rally during a campaign stop Sunday at the Grappone Center in Concord. AP

Monitor staff
Published: 3/10/2019 6:25:06 PM

Brittany Snow waited for one of the Democratic candidates for president to capture her attention. 

But as more and more early candidates announced their intention to run, Snow said she felt disappointed. She didn’t feel like any of them addressed her key issues aggressively enough: Most importantly, affordable education and support for those paying student loans. 

That is, until Sen. Bernie Sanders announced that he was running. 

“Up until that point, even though there were like, 10 candidates, I didn’t have a Democratic candidate that I was going to go for yet,” said Snow, who is in her 30s and lives in Concord. “ But when Bernie announced, I was stoked. I knew right away he was my man. ” 

Sanders, who handily defeated Hillary Clinton in New Hampshire during the 2016 presidential primary, returned to New Hampshire on Sunday for the first time since announcing his candidacy last month. He spoke in the Grappone Conference Center in Concord, repeating some of his standard platform points: a $15 minimum wage, Medicare for all and free access to higher education. 

“Our younger generation will have, if we do not change it, a lower standard of living than their parents. They are earning lower wages than their parents did, they go out into the world with higher debt than their parents did, housing for many of them is unaffordable, and they have less mobility,” the Vermont senator said to a cheering crowd. 

Snow, who works in the public school system, said she and her wife, Cassandra, who works for non-profits, live as working, middle class poor because of their student loans. The pair still owes a quarter of a million dollars, Snow said, something that isn’t manageable while also raising a son. 

“When you hear him say that, obviously that’s something that hits home,” she said, of Sanders’s agenda to support working-class young people. “We just need somebody that can help us survive, help our generation survive. What we have now is not a working model.” 

Snow said Sanders’s ideas still ring true to her, even years after his last presidential campaign. And while other Democratic candidates may have taken on similar issues in their platforms, Snow argues that Sanders was the one who did it first. 

“I know a lot of the hate that he's getting is that he’s a white, older man and that’s been historically what we go toward for president. But in my mind, I don’t see him as a white, older man,” she said. “I see him as a voice for the people.” 

Cassandra Snow said she feels like she can trust Sanders more than the other candidates. She knows what she’s getting with him, and she knows that won’t change, she said. 

“The thing with Bernie is, he doesn't compromise anything,” Cassandra said. “That's why he’s the far left. The other ones are okay, let’s see if I can play both sides.”

Other voters said they don’t think there’s another Democrat who has a better chance of beating Trump. 

“I think he would have beat him last time,” said Shaun Sutliff from Adams, Mass. “I think people are tired of regular candidates. I think last time, and even to some degree with the Republicans and Trump, people are looking for somebody different. Bernie is genuine and people saw that. Hillary was never able to carry that.” 

At the end of the day, it’s that genuine nature that will propel Sanders forward once again, Sutliff said. He has a resume to prove he means what he says, Sutliff said. 

“That man's been on picket lines,” Sutliff said. “They all talk the talk, but he’s been in the trench.” 

Ken Scupp from Bow said he’s still deciding who his pick in the primary will be. He went to see Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar when she visited New Hampshire. He said Klobuchar might have a chance at winning back some of the Midwestern states that typically vote Republican.

“It’s still early and a lot can happen. I’m concerned about the age factor with Bernie,” he said. “I just think we need some new blood.”




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