Two-sided issue addressed at Discover Wild N.H. Day

  • Anti-trapping protesters hold up signs outside New Hampshire Fish and Game headquarters on Hazen Drive in Concord during Discover Wild New Hampshire Day on Saturday. Elizabeth Frantz / Monitor staff

  • Bob Levasseur of Epsom talks to booth visitors about trapping at the New Hampshire Trapper’€™s Association tables during Discover Wild New Hampshire Day on Saturday. Elizabeth Frantz / Monitor staff

  • Anti-trapping protesters, including Pamela Michael (right) of Hudson and her husband Steve, hold up signs outside New Hampshire Fish and Game headquarters in Concord during Discover Wild New Hampshire Day, Saturday, April 21, 2018. (Photo by Elizabeth Frantz) Elizabeth Frantz—Monitor staff

  • Pelts and animal mount displays are seen at the New Hampshire Trapper’s Association tables during Discover Wild New Hampshire Day at New Hampshire Fish and Game headquarters in Concord on Saturday, April 21, 2018. (Photo by Elizabeth Frantz) Elizabeth Frantz—Monitor staff

  • Anti-trapping protesters hold up signs outside New Hampshire Fish and Game headquarters in Concord during Discover Wild New Hampshire Day, Saturday, April 21, 2018. (Photo by Elizabeth Frantz) Elizabeth Frantz—Monitor staff

  • Pelts and animal mount displays are seen at the New Hampshire Trapper’s Association tables during Discover Wild New Hampshire Day at New Hampshire Fish and Game headquarters in Concord on Saturday, April 21, 2018. (Photo by Elizabeth Frantz) Elizabeth Frantz—Monitor staff

  • Pelts and animal mount displays are seen at the N.H. Trapper’€™s Association tables during Discover Wild N. H. Day. Elizabeth Frantz / Monitor staff

  • Pelts and animal mount displays are seen at the New Hampshire Trapper’s Association tables during Discover Wild New Hampshire Day at New Hampshire Fish and Game headquarters in Concord on Saturday, April 21, 2018. (Photo by Elizabeth Frantz) Elizabeth Frantz—Monitor staff

Monitor staff
Published: 4/21/2018 7:54:21 PM

As visitors walked towards Discover Wild New Hampshire Day festivities from one of the parking lots on Hazen Drive, they passed protesters holding signs saying “trapping is torture” and “please don’t buy fur.” Just inside the event entrance, the New Hampshire Trapper’s Association had tables set up with fur pelts and animal mount displays.

Both groups had come to the New Hampshire Fish and Game headquarters in Concord on Saturday to educate people about the two sides of the same issue.

“I think trapping is a cruel, cowardly, unnecessary way to kill an animal, and it’s usually animals just for their fur. I think it’s archaic,” said Pamela Michael of Hudson, who distinguished trapping from other hunting methods as she stood amid the large group of sign holders.

At the Trapper’s Association booth, Bob Levasseur of Epsom described modern trapping methods as being evolved from olden days.

“It’s not bear traps with giant teeth ... that’s long gone from trapping,” he said, describing the foothold trap in front of him as having flat surface areas and small gaps that he says will grip an animal’s paw without digging into flesh or completely cutting off blood flow.

Those against trapping say fur has no practical applications left, calling recreational trapping a hobby that only tortures animals and results in devastating accidents.

“I’ve seen what these traps can do to domestic animals ... also of course wildlife,” said veterinary technician Elisabeth Shuter of Manchester.

Larry Torr of Madbury has seen a fall in fur prices, but they make no difference in his trapping since he approaches the method from a wildlife management perspective.

“The market right now is really low as far as fur prices,” he said. “I still trap because I have a relationship with a landowner and the landowner expects me to trap every year to control animals on his property whether or not the fur prices are high or not.”

“One of the main reasons we manage fur bearers is to control disease and populations,” said Torr.




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