Demolition continues on old Concord Steam plant

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  • ABOVE: Steve Royer of D.L. King Contractors of Nashua watches an excavator at work a the former Concord Steam site on Pleasant Street on Monday morning. LEFT: What remains of the silos at the Concord Steam complex on Monday.

  • An excavator from EnviroVantage takes down one of the two silos that were part of the former Concord Steam complex on Pleasant Street on Monday morning. GEOFF FORESTER photos / Monitor staff

  • An excavator from EnviroVantage demolition takes down one of the two silos that were part of the former Concord Steam complex on Pleasant Street on Monday morning, September 21, 2020. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • ABOVE: Steve Royer of D.L. King Contractors of Nashua watches as a demolition crew works at the former Concord Steam site. LEFT: An excavator operator works on demolishing one of the silos on Pleasant Street.

  • Steve Royer of D.L. King Contractors of Nashua sprays water to keep the dust down as an excavator from EnviroVantage demolition takes down one of the two silos that were part of the former Concord Steam complex on Pleasant Street on Monday morning, September 21, 2020. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • The silos from the former Concord Steam complex are being torn down on Monday morning, September 21, 2020. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • An excavator from EnviroVantage demolition takes down one of the two silos that were part of the former Concord Steam complex on Pleasant Street on Monday morning, September 21, 2020. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • The Concord Steam Corporation plant on Pleasant Street at night. (GEOFF FORESTER / Monitor staff) GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • Workers from Sprint work on taking down cell transmission equipment on the chimney at the old Concord Steam plant off of Pleasant Street in Concord on Monday December 11, 2017. The free-standing chimney at the old Concord Steam plant needs repairs as the State of New Hampshire decides what to do after the de-commissioning of the plant continues. Boston Chimney and Power inspected the tower and discovered some leaning caused by cracks in the 100-foot tower off of Pleasant Street, according to Mike Connor, deputy administrator with the Department of Administrative Services for the state of New Hampshire. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • An excavator from EnviroVantage demolition takes down one of the two silos that were part of the former Concord Steam complex on Pleasant Street on Monday morning, September 21, 2020. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • An excavator from EnviroVantage demolition takes down one of the two silos that were part of the former Concord Steam complex on Pleasant Street on Monday morning, September 21, 2020. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

  • An excavator from EnviroVantage demolition takes down one of the two silos that were part of the former Concord Steam complex on Pleasant Street on Monday morning, September 21, 2020. GEOFF FORESTER—Monitor staff

Monitor staff
Published: 9/21/2020 4:20:36 PM

The long demise of the Concord Steam plant on Pleasant Street is continuing after a pause caused by the pandemic, with the two massive wood-chip silos and the remains of the chimney getting demolished this week.

Although exact timing will depend on whether any unpleasant surprises are encountered, such as the asbestos found this week, the work is slated to be done by mid-November, said Michael Connor, deputy commissioner of the state Department of Administrative Services.

“There are two tunnels that connected to the plant that have to be deal with … and a couple of No. 6 oil tanks, 77,000 gallons each,” said Connor.

The result will be an empty lot with a two-story retaining wall. At that point, Connor said, engineers will come in and determine how to proceed with phase two, which will complete the process and produce a parking lot. The total budgeted cost is $2.9 million.

D.L. King of Nashua is the general contractor of the first phase.

The power plant closed in 2017, ending a century of operation.

It originally provided steam heat to the nearby state hospital. In 1977 it was bought by Roger Bloomfield, who connected it to an existing plant on Bridge Street that heated some downtown buildings, creating Concord Steam. Bloomfield converted the boiler from oil to wood chips at about the same time. The Bridge Street plant was demolished decades ago.

The company grew over the years, eventually providing steam heat through underground pipes to more than 100 buildings in the Hugh Gallen State Office Park and throughout downtown Concord.

Company plans to replace the aging power plant were scuttled by the 2008 financial crisis, and then by customers shifting to cheaper natural gas heat. When the state government, Concord Steam’s biggest customer, announced that it was shifting much of its heating needs to gas, the company ran out of money and shut down.

The State House, State House Annex and New Hampshire State Library are the only buildings still heated by steam because they were judged too historic to be torn up for a different heating system to be installed. Their steam comes from a new plant at the corner of School and Green streets.




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