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‘Scene and Heard’ brings radio to stage at Bishop Brady

  • Brennan Corrigan (left to right), Daniel Siletti, Georgia Atkinson and Maria Bailey rehearse a segment titled “Seasons” from “Scene and Heard” at Bishop Brady High School in Concord, May 10, 2016. (ELIZABETH FRANTZ / Monitor staff)

  • Daniel Siletti (left) and Brennan Corrigan rehearse a radio segment titled “Colonel Frothingham, Intrepid Antiquitist” from “Scene and Heard” at Bishop Brady High School in Concord, May 10, 2016. (ELIZABETH FRANTZ / Monitor staff)

  • FROM LEFT: Brennan Corrigan, Daniel Siletti, Georgia Atkinson and Maria Bailey rehearse a segment titled “€œSeansons”€ from €during a rehearsal of “œScene and Heard”€ at Bishop Brady High School in Concord on Tuesday. Photos by ELIZABETH FRANTZ / Monitor staff

  • Brennan Corrigan appears in “€œIt’s a Bird, it’s a Plane, it’s Chickenman”€ during rehearsal for “€œScene and Heard.”

  • Georgia Atkinson rehearses a segment from “Scene and Heard” at Bishop Brady High School in Concord, May 10, 2016. (ELIZABETH FRANTZ / Monitor staff)



Monitor staff
Friday, May 13, 2016

In the days before television sets were in nearly every home in the country, people tuned in each week just to listen to their favorite program on the radio.

The Bishop Brady Players will bring a few of those programs, along with one-act plays, to the stage with Scene and Heard.

The show will include three short plays: one about a television screenwriter who didn’t do his job quite right, one about an unexpected train passenger and one about some less than perfect families over the holidays.

“It’s not your Norman Rockwell type of holiday,” said the show’s director, Jean Ver Hoeven.

Interspersed are two major radio segments and three commercials.

“The stories are so good,” Ver Hoeven said.

The commercials are original, but the one-acts and radio segments are from professional scripts. Ver Hoeven said the radio shows follow the superhero, mystery and sitcom formats popular in the 1930s and 40s.

Students Georgia Atkinson, Maria Bailey, Brennan Corrigan and Daniel Siletti will bring the classic stories to life, with plenty of help from the audience.

These shows are a riot with the sound effects and audience interaction, Ver Hoeven said.

The show comes with cue cards, and the audience will be expected to help with some of the sound effects – some will even be equipped with noisemakers.

“If we get a good crowd, that will be good,” Ver Hoeven said.

The show will be held in the Bishop Brady cafeteria.

“We all need some escapism; we all need some fun,” Ver Hoeven said. She added that the radio shows are family-friendly and will appeal to those who remember them from their heyday and to those being introduced to the entertainment style for the first time.

The show has had a few evolutions along the way due to students’ busy schedules. Originally the thought was to perform Arsenic and Old Lace, then it morphed into a murder mystery show. Ver Hoeven then looked for something a little different and discovered online that some West Coast companies were doing radio shows as theater. Ver Hoeven hopes the trend will continue on the East Coast.

“It’s a very good break from the high-tech entertainment we’re used to,” she said.

Shows will be tonight at 7 and Saturday at 1 p.m. Tickets are $8 at the door, and you can get a $1 off by bringing in the show’s ad from Thursday’s Monitor on D4.