Several monuments in New Hampshire include pieces of the World Trade Center

  • Located within Benson Park, a memorial was created 10 years ago for those who died on Sept. 11, including Hudson resident David Kovalcin, a passenger on Flight 11 when it struck theWorld Trade Center. BENJAMIN DOMAINGUE—Monitor staff

  • Located within Benson Park, a memorial was created in memoriam for Hudson resident David Kovalcin, a passenger on Flight 11 when it struck the North Tower of the World Trade Center. BENJAMIN DOMAINGUE—Monitor staff

  • Located within Benson Park, a memorial was created in memoriam for Hudson resident David Kovalcin, a passenger on Flight 11 when it struck the North Tower of the World Trade Center. BENJAMIN DOMAINGUE—Monitor staff

  • A monument for the World Trade Center attack of the South tower on Sept. 11, 2001. BENJAMIN DOMAINGUE / Monitor staff

  • BENJAMIN DOMAINGUE photos / Monitor staff

Monitor staff
Published: 9/7/2021 5:32:29 PM

A paved walkway following the path of United Airlines Flight 93 in a quiet park in Southern New Hampshire leads visitors to a steel beam that was part of the World Trade Center. 

Hudson is one of four towns in the Granite State to display pieces of the original towers to memorialize those lost on September 11, 2001. Each of those spots will host ceremonies this weekend to commemorate 20 years since the attacks.

Located within Benson Park, the memorial was dedicated 10 years ago to the firefighters, first responders and citizens who died that day, including Hudson resident David Kovalcin, a passenger on Flight 11 when it struck the North Tower of the World Trade Center.

“His children went to our schools,” said Selectman and former Fire Captain David Morin. “When 9/11 happened, the town and the firefighters had put together a huge equipment and food drive to bring down to New York City.”

The monument was a result of an outpouring of community effort spearheaded by Morin and Fire Chief Robert Buxton. Immediately after the idea was brought up to the community, a 9/11 Memorial Committee was formed, consisting of first responders, public workers, officials and residents. The design of the monument was drafted by the committee within 15 minutes of their first meeting.

“Between all of the people who were there, they threw out ideas and it was drawn on a table napkin,” said Morin.  

The memorial itself was constructed within two weeks, in order to prepare it for its dedication on September 11, 2011.

The committee members took construction into their own hands to get it done in time for the 10 year anniversary, Morin and Buxton said.

The memorial has immense attention to detail, with each piece having some relation to the attack. For example, the path of the sidewalk leading up to the memorial follows the flight path of United Airlines Flight 93, which crashed in Somerset County, Pennsylvania.

The town holds an annual ceremony for those lost on September 11, 2001.

“We have our local high school band play patriotic songs,” said Morin. “One of our firefighters that we just hired was in High School in New York City near Ground Zero on the day it happened, so he’s going to be the guest speaker.”

Much like Hudson, the Cathedral of the Pines in Rindge hosts its own ceremony in conjunction with artist/poet Jim Pelletier, 68, of Winchendon.

Pelletier has worked with the Cathedral of the Pines for 13 years. Prior to his work there, he spent several years volunteering in New York City after the attacks.

“I spent several years at Ground Zero volunteering to get people back into doing something and getting their minds off of what happened,” said Pelletier.

Pelletier proposed creating a recording of the victims of the attack, a staple of his annual ceremony.

“I contacted the United Nations to see if their language department would help with the pronunciation of the names,” said Pelletier. “They said yes.”

These ceremonies are hosted to honor those who lost their lives, but also to also serve as an educational experience for students and community members alike.

“I think that history is best taught through something that’s tangible,” said Buxton. “The ability for people to come here and walk through and have an understanding of what each piece of the memorial actually means … I think for folks it becomes real.”

For Pelletier, hosting the ceremony at the Cathedral of the Pines serves to build acceptance and promote peace within the community and beyond.

“It is a place where we transition from suffering and loss to peace and acceptance - it is the incarnation of that,” said Pelletier. “I want people to know that this was created [this recording] the basic thing that this is based on that dignity is more powerful than destruction.”

If you go

 The Town of Hudson will host its observance on September 11th at 9:30am at Benson Park.

Remember to Remember will host its observance at 8:45am at the Cathedral of the Pines in Rindge. 




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